7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet

7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet

People believe that this style of jewelry began in the 1980s when Chris Evert famously lost her diamond bracelet during a tennis match, but nothing could be further from the truth. Here is the story, according to diamond expert Fred Cuellar: The diamond in-line bracelet has become a jewelry powerhouse, yet few people know its true story. In fact, the diamond line bracelet began the trend that would later be made famous as the tennis bracelet of Chris Evert legend. Originally named diamond in-line or line bracelets, they hit the scene at the turn of the 20th century, showing up at Harry Winston and Tiffany, but the idea for lining up small same shape diamonds originally came from DeBeers. You see, while the diamond engagement ring was taking off like a bullet in the U.S., there was still a horrible ratio of diamonds that exceeded 1/4 carat in size to make an attractive engagement ring to the thousands of small "insignificant" diamonds called mêlée (diamonds) whose size is less than 1/4 carat. The higher-ups at DeBeers just sacked and stored all the small mêlée diamonds until an executive (nobody will tell me who) came up with the idea to line them all up like little soldiers and sell them as stackable bracelets. When the in-line diamond bracelets hit the store shelves, they flew off! Since a moving diamond in light sparkles the most, a lot of them on a bracelet constantly spinning and twirling would create a cascade of rainbows. The diamond line bracelet was a hit! The socialites loved them. A sign of wealth was quickly established: who could wear the most in-line bracelets on each wrist? The aristocrats were happy, DeBeers were happy, and the stock piles came down. Then in 1987, at the U.S. Open, Chris Evert lost one of her in-line bracelets, halting the match while everyone got down on their hands and knees looking for it. While apparently not planned, the lost bracelet at the match eventually became known as the tennis bracelet. The rest is history.

In her autobiographical novel entitled "We Danced All Night," about life in England in the 1920s, Dame Barbara Cartland recounts an evening at the Embassy, a popular nightclub for the "Bright Young Things," a group of aristocratic and wealthy socialites whose heyday was at the height of the roaring 20s: "As one enters, the room seems like a bowl of animated sweet peas; nearly every woman is wearing a chiffon dress which flutters as she moves and has a long chiffon scarf hanging down from one shoulder. Also on the shoulder is a bunch of real or artificial flowers, and round every thin, graceful left wrist are row upon row of narrow diamond bracelets jokingly known as "service stripes."

This bracelet is from a Boston estate, but its former owner was a European woman who married during World War II and moved to the United States. It has been recently appraised, and the new owner will receive the appraisal along with the bracelet. It is made of platinum and iridium, the rarest kind of platinum, and 38 high quality diamonds with a total weight of 7 carats. The bracelet is set in Art Deco style square links and is 7 inches long. It will arrive in a Cartier style red presentation box with gold embossing, lined in white velvet and satin. Divine!

This item is on consignment.

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Item ID: TC234


Gender: Female, Age Group: Adult, Color: Platinum, Size: One size fits all

7 Carat Diamond and Iridium Platinum Art Deco In-Line Line Bracelet

$17,000 USD

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Cynthia Lambert
Hudson
NY
  

Luxury Items, Vintage Vanity Sets and Antiques

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