Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"

We are delighted to offer an immense impressionistic oil painting on canvas of a forest scene with two nude figures of ladies by a waterfall, signed Lillian Genth, lower right. The canvas size is 51" high by 39" wide. The frame size is 58.25" high by 50.5" wide. It is in excellent condition with no discernable flaws.

This is an extraordinarily huge painting by one of America’s leading female artists, LILLIAN GENTH (1875/6-1953). It features two young women wading along a cascading stream, one is clearly enjoying the experience, and the other is terrified. We have seen only one other painting by her that was this same large size; and that one had only one nude female and it sold for $7,500. If you have room to exhibit this painting, it is a wonderful buy! She painted her nudes in a landscape between 1906 and 1928, so our painting dates to that period.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

"Lillian Mathilde Genth (1876 - March 28, 1953) was an American impressionist artist. She is best known for her depiction of female nudes in landscape settings. However, in the middle of her career she swore off painting female nudes and began painting more conservative paintings inspired by her travels. In about 30 years Genth appeared in 233 exhibitions, and while well renowned for her paintings while alive, her story and artwork have been lost in the retelling of American art history.

During her time in Europe, Genth first settled in Paris, France in October 1900 where she enrolled in art classes at the Academie Carmen, an art school run by James McNeil Whistler. Whistler became a large influence on Genth’s work and she was known to be a favorite pupil of his. During one of Whistler’s visits to the school in 1900, he was so impressed by Genth’s work that he gave her a paint palette; an honor that she used and treasured for the rest of her career. This was an incredible compliment from Whistler, who rarely accepted women painters.

Genth’s style is typically attributed to Whistler because of her paintings' tonalist qualities and because he taught her to see her paintings as a whole instead of in individual parts. After the Academie Carmen closed in 1901, Genth stayed in Europe for three more years. During this time she worked on painting landscapes, genre scenes, and waterfronts; her nudes would not begin for a few more years.

In 1904 Genth returned to the United States and was living in New York City. It was at this point that her career began to flourish. In 1904 Genth showed at three exhibitions: the National Academy of Design, Art Club of Philadelphia, and Worcester Museum. In October of that same year she appeared in her first individual show at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Also in 1904 Genth received the Mary Shaw Prize for the best landscape in the show for her work Peasant Houses, Normandy at an exhibition at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Critics and the general public began noticing and appreciating Genth’s work during this beneficial year.

Through the next couple of years Genth continued to show at the nation’s most important art galleries, museums, and art clubs. In 1906 Genth developed her interest in the female nude. She quit drawing her European-inspired landscapes and focused on the female form. She quickly developed skills in drawing the nude female form and established her style that depicts nude females in landscape settings. When Genth was asked why she changed her form she responded, "Because to me the most beautiful thing in the world is the human figure outdoors. In Brittany, one day I took a model out and posed her in the open and I was at once filled with resentment at all the beauty I had been missing."

The conservative Victorian society was not ready to accept Genth’s nude figures and at first her paintings were often rejected by exhibitions and advisors told her to abandon her new iconography. However, Genth, known for her fierce personality, persevered through these setbacks. In 1908 her painting, The Lark, won her the Shaw Memorial Prize at the 83rd Annual Exhibition of the National Academy of Design. The Lark depicts a full female nude strolling through the woods with her head turned looking toward the sky as if she just heard a lark, as the title suggests. This painting successfully demonstrates Whistler’s influence on Genth through the integration of the nude form and the landscape. The success of the painting relies on the focus of the painting as a whole to make the nude form grounded in the landscape instead of looking out of place.

Also in 1908, Genth was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate. She was the youngest woman ever elected to this position at the academy. From 1910 until 1929 Genth appeared in at least 164 exhibitions. During these years she experienced a lot of success, popularity, and wealth. She split her time between her two residences; one is an apartment in New York City, and the other is a large estate in the Berkshire Mountains in Connecticut, which she named Hermitcliff. Hermitcliff was an estate of 70 acres of woodland and it was here that Genth was able to paint her models uninterrupted. She loved coming to Hermitcliff and used it well throughout the years. She said about her beloved estate, “The things I have learned have come from the soil in the depths of my woods in Connecticut."

After overcoming preliminary obstacles and achieving success in her nude forms, Genth, in 1928 began exploring other art forms and no longer painted nudes.

Please examine the photos closely. They are an important part of the description. If you need more information than provided, please ask for clarification prior to purchasing. We make every effort to describe items accurately, including their condition.

SHIPPING: Local pick up only. Due to the huge size of this painting, it will have to be shipped via freight. The BUYER must make all shipping arrangements. Two shippers that we have used successfully are Plycon Transportation Group (1-888-655-2664) and Craters & Freighters, OKC (1- 405-943-3069). However, we expect that the shipping will be more than $300, but it may be substantially less as it is currently packed and ready for shipment. After payment, we will share our address with the buyer so that the shipper will know where to pick up this magnificent painting.

Buyer’s Responsibility for Reporting Damaged Items:

In the unlikely event of a damage claim, the buyer must report such damage to the seller and to the shipper within 48 hours of receipt of the item(s) in order for the buyer to make a damage claim to the shipping agent. The buyer must take photos of any damaged item, as well as photos of the original packing material, and forward such evidence to the shipper. The buyer must retain all original packing material and submit all items required for review by the shipping agent to initiate a damage claim and any applicable insurance payment to the buyer. Failure to keep items for review for the buyer’s insurance claim or to notify the seller and the shipper of any loss within these guidelines will forfeit rights of the buyer to seek insurance reimbursement for the damaged goods received.

Item ID: OSP-00122

Huge and magnificent oil painting by LILLIAN GENTH titled "Two Nudes"

$3,500 USD

Add to Cart
Questions about this item?
Email Shop

15 other shoppers have this item in their Cart or Wish List

The Reckless Necklace

Kitty Curry
Oklahoma City, OK   

Fine Paintings & Sculptures, Fine Jewelry and Gemstone One of a Kind - Handmade Beautiful Necklaces

Be Reckless Dare to Wear - Wearable Art

Member since 2010

Shipping & Handling:Freight (cost to be determined)
Shipping to: USA
140 character limit

More from The Reckless Necklace