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Frank Harchuska, Palmyra PA   

Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!

Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case. Case & Dial are manufacture Dated 1887. Has the early Pinned Hands, and 4 Pinned Brass Posts on the original Movement. It has been estimated that only 5% of Seth Thomas Model #2 Railroad Clocks were had Walnut Wood Cases !

Date Code Stencil Stamped on Back of Case, and tiny Rubber Stamped on the back of the Zinc Dial, as seen in the last photo.

Purebred with 2 Railroad property indicators as follows ; Crisp Stencil Painted Seth Thomas Metal painted Dial is marked "Virginian Railway". Also has a Virginian Railway "Logo Printed Color Paper instruction Label" on the interior top side of door frame, as seen in the 4th photo.

Solid Walnut Case with Walnut Veneered Round Wood Bezel. This Clock is "Solid as a Rock" with a Tight Hinged Door and Lock, and is Keeping Accurate Time. Also retains it's Seth Thomas Factory Black Paper Label on the interior bottom.

Original Brass Movement is also marked with "Seth Thomas Circled Diamond Logo". Was found Clean, and has been Re-oiled and Beat Set on 10-12-15.

Measures Standard Size : Overall 36 inches Long, 15 3/4 inches Wide at Wood Bezel Dial, and is 5 1/2 inches Deep.

You have my personal satisfaction guarantee for an 7 Day inspection period on all my 8 day Clocks, or you get a no questions asked full item refund. (less shipping fees)

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Shipping ; Will ship out on the First Business Day following a Sunday after picking up from an Antique Mall. Or could be picked up in person at the Sundays only, Adamstown, PA. Antique Mall.

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Historical Notes on the Virginian Railway 1907 to 1959.

The Virginian Railway Company was formed in Virginia on March 8, 1907 to combine the Deepwater Railway in West Virginia and the Tidewater Railway in Virginia into a single interstate railroad, only a few months after Victoria was incorporated. On April 15, 1907, William Nelson Page became the first president of the new Virginian Railway. Work progressed on the VGN throughout 1907 and 1908 using construction techniques not available when the larger railroads had been built about 25 years earlier. By paying for work with Henry Rogers' own personal fortune, the railway was built with no public debt. This feat, a key feature of the successful secrecy in securing the route, was not accomplished without some considerable burden to Rogers, however. Rogers suffered some financial setbacks in the Financial Panic of 1907 which began in March. Then, a few months later that same year, he experienced a debilitating stroke. He was largely disabled for five months. Fortunately, Henry Rogers recovered his health, at least partially, and saw to it that construction was continued on the new railroad until it was finally completed early in 1909. Last spike, celebrations[edit] The last spike in the Virginian Railway was driven on January 29, 1909, at the west side of the massive New River Bridge at Glen Lyn, near where the new railroad crossed the West Virginia-Virginia state line. In April 1909, Henry Huttleston Rogers and Mark Twain, old friends, returned to Norfolk, Virginia together once again for a huge celebration of the new "Mountains to the Sea" railroad's completion. Rogers left the next day on his first (and only) tour of the newly completed railroad. He died suddenly only six weeks later at the age of 69 at his home in New York. But by then, the work of the Page-Rogers partnership to build the Virginian Railway had been completed. While neither William Page, or Henry Rogers ended up running the railway, it was arguably a crowning lifetime achievement for each man. Together, they had conceived and built a modern, well-engineered rail pathway from the coal mines of West Virginia to port at Hampton Roads right under the noses of the big railroads. The Virginian Railway could operate more efficiently than its larger competitors, had all-new infrastructure, and no debt. It was an accomplishment like no other in the history of US railroading, before or since.

Operating and Electrifying "the Richest Little Railroad in the World" One of the original electric units : Mr. Rogers left his heirs and employees with a marvelous new railroad which remained closely held until 1937; his son and sons-in-law such as Urban H. Broughton and William R. Coe were among its leaders. Coe served almost its entire history. Throughout that profitable 50-year history, the VGN continued to follow the Page-Rogers policy of "paying up front for the best." It became particularly well known for treating its employees and vendors well, another investment that paid rich dividends. The VGN sought (and achieved) best efficiencies in the mountains, rolling piedmont and flat tidewater terrain. The profitable VGN experimented with the finest and largest steam, electric, and diesel locomotives. It was well known for operating the largest and best equipment, and could afford to. It became nicknamed "the richest little railroad in the world." The VGN had a very major grade at Clark's Gap, West Virginia, and tried large steam locomotives before turning to an alternative already in use by one of its neighboring competitors, Norfolk & Western Railway: a railway electrification system. With work authorized beginning in 1922, a 134-mile portion of the railroad in the mountains from Mullens, West Virginia over Clark's Gap and several other major grades to Roanoke, Virginia was equipped with overhead wires supported by a catenary system. The VGN built its own power plant at Narrows, Virginia. The electrification was completed in 1925 at a cost of $15 million, equal to $201,717,268 today. A link was established with Norfolk & Western to share electricity from its nearby electrification during contingencies. ALCO and Westinghouse supplied the electric locomotives, which were equipped with pantographs. The 36 initial units were normally linked in groups of three as one set, and had much greater load capacity than the steam power they replaced. In 1948, four huge EL-2B twin-unit locomotives were purchased, followed by twelve EL-C rectifier locomotives in 1955. VGN 36 Fairbanks-Morse H-16-44 diesel locomotive crossing the diamond with Norfolk & Western Railway at South Norfolk, VA. The seemingly remotely located terminal Page and Rogers planned and built at Sewell's Point played an important role in 20th-century U.S. naval history. Beginning in 1917 the former Jamestown Exposition grounds adjacent to the VGN coal pier was an important facility for the United States Navy. The VGN transported the high quality "smokeless" West Virginia bituminous coal favored by the US Navy for its ships, providing a reliable supply during both World Wars. In the mid-1950s VGN management realized that the company's devotion to coal as its energy source (for steam locomotives and the power plant at Narrows for the electrification system) was becoming overshadowed by the economies of diesel-electric locomotives and a scarcity of parts for the older steam locomotives. Between 1954 and 1957 a total of 66 diesel-electric locomotives were purchased, including 25 Fairbanks-Morse H-24-66 Train Masters, and 40 H-16-44 smaller road switchers, two with steam generators to haul passenger trains. The last steam locomotive operated in June, 1957. At the end of 1925 VGN operated 545 route-miles on 902 miles of track; at the end of 1956 mileages were 611 and 1089.

Sold off, then merged with Southern in 1959.

Item ID: 5106

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Early "Virginian Railway" Seth Thomas #2 Regulator Clock with 3 Piece Bottom in a Pristine Walnut Case made in 1887 !!!

$1,875 USD SOLD

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Frank Harchuska
Palmyra
PA
  

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