c1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontilc1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontil

Antique hand blown lead crystal glass wine rinser from about 215 years ago with 36 flute-cuts encircling its lower section, two pouring spouts, and ground and polished pontil scar (see all 15 Photos). This wine rinse is either early American or British in production and dates from the 1790 to 1820 period, hence the c1805 mid-date. The pouring spouts were designed to secure wine glasses by holding their stems as they lay diagonally inside the vessel (see Photo 2) and when the rinse was filled with iced water - - it functioned as a wine glass cooler. Under a different role, it could be used, instead to rinse wine glasses between servings or beverage changes. And this wine glass cooler is among the earlier flint glass forms produced for the middle classes in America and exhibits the same narrow cut flutes along its lower section that were also popular on glass tumblers, decanters and bottles of the same period (e.g., see Arlene Palmer’s ‘Glass in Early America’ published by the Winterthur Museum in 1993, particularly example #48 which is an American made flint glass Tumbler on pg 89, also see Irish/England flint glass Fountain on pages 130-131).

Importantly, only the flute cut wine rinser/cooler shown all by itself in Photos 1, 3, 5 through 9, and Photos 11 and 12 is for sale here in this listing. All other glass vessels exhibited in the remaining other Photos are not for sale at this time, but are display for comparative purposes only. For example, the Ruby Red glass shown in Photos 2 and 4 helps illustrate the size of a wine glass that fits easily inside the wine rinse (Ruby Red wine glass is not for sale). The two wine glasses in Photo 10 and the other glass vessels in Photos 13, 14 and 15 are also shown for comparison only and are not for sale here.

As already noted, the wine rinse offered here is composed of quality lead crystal glass that fluoresces purple-white under short-wave UV light as the last two Photos illustrate. One can see it fluoresce even with regular indoor lights on as long as one uses a Short-wave UV source at the same time. Long-wave UV light does not cause lead glass to fluoresce and this absence of glowing fluorescence is easily recognized in a digital photograph of lead glass under Long-wave UV light. The last two Photos display seven glass objects being exposed to Short-wave UV light. Short-wave UV light is harmful to eyes and should not be used without proper protective eye gear (therefore, do not try this at home on your own). More insight on flint glass vessels and UV fluorescence is provided further below where the seven glass vessels exhibited in the last two photos are also discussed in more detail.

Glass wine glass coolers/rinsers emerged as fashionable among the wealthier classes in the late 1700s. Cutting block ice from fresh water lakes in the winter was a valued industry in the northern American colonies (and in other countries, too) in the 1700s. The ice was harvested for use in warmer months. Ice storage facilities often used saw dust and below ground burial to preserve blocks well into future summer months. Wine rinses and coolers were one manifestation of changing table fashions that were most popular from the late 1700s up to about 1870, possibly falling out of fashion with the rise of germ theory, some water borne epidemics and access to cheaper bottled beverages in the late 1800s.

The Photos show that the wine cooler listed for sale here has a large, concave ground and polished pontil area where the glass grinder removed the pontil scar from the center part of the base so that the vessel would sit perfectly flat (Photo 9). Still, there is a small residual pit remaining near the center of the ground area that represents where the original pontil scar pulled some additional glass from the base as the pontil rod was detached. This same small indent is also shown in Photo 9 with a black pen pointing to it while reflected light helps highlight the small pit (see Photo9).

This wine rinse also display some common impurities typical of early leaded flint glass. It has a few small opaque inclusions and some tiny bubbles scatter throughout - - all of which are typical of hand blown early American and British flint glass vessels from this period (one of the larger opaque white inclusions is shown in Photo 12). And as expected, this flint glass vessel rings cleanly like a bell when gently tapped with a pencil and holds onto the ting for about 5 seconds.

And as expected, there are no factory names or glass makers marks on this wine rinse and so we do not know who produced it. The rinser’s slightly expanding cylindrical shape, hand tooled rim and lips, large ground and polished pontil and its flint glass content are consistent with its production between 1790 and 1820 for American, English and Irish glass factories. Of course, American wine rinsers/coolers from before 1800 are less common to see today than those produced in the early 1800s.

Photos 14 and 15 (the last two photos) display seven glass vessels with three made of nonleaded soda glass that do not fluoresce and four other vessels containing lead oxide that fluoresce with differing intensity under Short-wave UV light due to variations in lead oxide components. The layout of the seven glass vessels remains exactly the same in both Photos. Photo 14 reveals that the c1800 small wine glass on the viewers right side and the c1805 wine rinse in the middle of the Photo fluoresce a strong purple-white under Short-wave UV light. Two other vessels fluoresce far less intensely and apparently have a glass composition with less lead-oxide. These two other vessels are a (1) c1840 pharmaceutical jar at the far left (more clearly seen in Photo 15, the last Photo), and a c1830 three ring spirit decanter with a band of strawberry diamond cutting below its shoulder on the viewers far right in the last two Photos (see Photos 14 and 15).

The remaining three vessels in Photos 14 and 15 do not fluoresce and, so, are best observed in the last Photo (see Photo 15). They are composed of soda glass which does not contain lead-oxide and therefore does not fluoresce under Short-wave UV light. They include a small octagonal cordial glass located on the viewer's left (in Photo 15 is seen as second item in from left), a c1880 toastmaster's firing glass just placed just behind the small octagonal cordial (a toastmaster's glass has a very small capacity caused by extra thick walls), and a 20th century trumpet -footed pressed diamond pattern punch glass just to the right of the wine rinse (see Photo 15).

Originally, cut glass rinsers were used to clean wine glasses between different courses and beverages. And as glass coolers, they were also used to chill footed stemware in regions where pond ice was harvested during the winter and then stored for use during warmer seasons. After the railroads expanded south in the US, harvested ice was shipped from the north to most large cities across the southern U.S. until regional ice plants were able to produce artificial ice and absorb the market. So whether you collect antique finger bowls, wine coolers/rinsers, wine glasses or are simply looking for a fine Georgian or Federal period flute-cut glass wine rinser in very good condition (see condition notes below), then this may be just the one for you. And of course, it also comes with my full satisfaction guarantee or you may return it using my return policy as explained below.

SIZE AND CONDITION: This glass wine rinse stands about 3 4/16 inches tall along its rim, measures about 4 inches across at its rim and expands to about 5 inches across from outer spout lip to opposite spout lip. While the base has a general diameter of about 3 1/2 inches, the rounded transition from the vertical sides of the rinse make the flat bottom of the rinse just 3 inches across when ignoring the hollowed out pontil area. The ground and polished concave pontil area itself measures just about 2 1/4 inches in diameter and is recessed concave inward about 1/8 of an inch. As for Condition, this wine cooler/rinse is in very good condition with no stains or haziness to the glass and no hairlines, cracks, chips, major scratches, repairs or restorations. The rim and spouts have no dings or chips and the base has no deep scratches or chips. Wear is evident along the base when using reflected light and when viewing up close, as one would natural expect for a vessel over 200 years old. Of course, if the buyer is not completely satisfied, then she/he may return this antique glass rinser for a refund (see our refund policy noted below).

SHIPPING: All US mainland buyers pay $9.80 for well packed USPS Priority Mail and this is an estimated savings of $1 to $4 since insurance and tracking are INCLUDED in this amount. That is, this is less than the actual insured shipping costs we expect to spend or we refund the difference back to you, and there are never any handling or packing fees added to any of your Docs Antiques purchases, ever. All international buyers will also pay less than the actual shipping costs for all verifiable locations outside the Continental US mainland. Send us your COMPLETE FULL ADDRESS details and then we will email you possibly up to four options for sending this item to your address and country. These are estimated to range from about $42 USD up to $69 USD depending on shipping choice and final destination. Importantly, all VAT, Customs fees, import taxes, and tariffs are NOT INCLUDED our shipping costs and, therefore, are always the buyer’s responsibility. Please check with your country's Customs Office to determine what additional Custom’s charges, taxes and tariffs are anticipated prior to purchasing this item -- thanks.

RETURN POLICY: Satisfaction and peace of mind are guaranteed for all Docs Antiques listings here on Ruby Lane. And this means that if the buyer is unhappy with a purchase, then she/he may return it by sending the item back undamaged and post marked within twenty-one days of the original receipt of the item at your address for a refund Items damaged by shipping in the US are covered by insurance and while this rarely happens because we pack professionally, we will gladly help you file your insurance claim should it ever be necessary. Of course, never send an item back that has been damaged by shipping since that will void the original insurance. Instead, contact us for help if you have any questions and we will gladly assist.
PAYMENT OPTIONS: Checks on US Banks (no temporary checks, all checks must have 9 digit routing code; item ships after check fully clears), USPS money orders, PayPal, or contact us with your verified address for more options. If you wish to use a credit card by way of PayPal, then that option becomes available after you submit a Ruby Lane purchase order. Once submitted, a PayPal icon will appear at the bottom of this listing and then you may proceed from there if you wish to pay via PayPal by way of a credit card. Or see our Terms of Sale for additional information should you wish to ask for a customized layaway plan customized to your own needs and situation (email me a request for a customized layaway). Thanks for looking and we invite you back again when you have more time.


Ask about our customized Layaway program if you wish to spread out your payments for buying an anniversary or Birthday gift, Holiday or graduation present or maybe just a special treat for yourself.
ITEM ID
RL981.a
ITEM TYPE
Antique
TYPE
Crystal Glass, Flint Glass

c1805 Hand Blown Flint Glass Wine Rinse or Cooler with Opposing Spouts, Flute-cut Lower Body and Ground Pontil

$81 $150 SALE

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