RASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figuresRASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figuresRASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figuresRASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figuresRASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figuresRASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figuresRASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figures

Gouache on paper laid on board, 20" by 14 1/4", signed at top left and dated 1960 by the artist, RASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980). This is a modernistic view of three Indian women, balancing pots on their heads, a goat grazing at lower left among their anklet draped feet. The artist's works have sold into five figures at Sotheby's auctions of contemporary and modern Indian art. His style is almost immediately recognizable, the figures usuall elongated in this manner and placed against a simple, non distracting background. A biography found on line: "Born in 1928, Rasik Raval spent his boyhood in Sabarkatha, Gujrat, India. After his father's untimely death in 1944, he went to Bombay [Mumbai] to study art at Sir J J School of Arts. After completion of his course in 1949, harsh realities of survival dealt a ruthless blow to him. In those desolate days, he lived and painted off the pavement until one day his work caught the eye of a notable art connoisseur, Farokh Mulla. When asked why more paintings are not coming from him, Rasik Raval shyly told him that he does not have a place to work. On hearing this, Mulla took him to his residence to set up his studio. Raval's studio pulled art lovers like a magnet. Collectors started picking his work even before the paint was dry. He was the fresh new face of Indian Art-direct, sensitive and true to his native land. His paintings sold internationally. Noted British Poet Stephen Spender bought his works calling them 'Poems in Line and Colour'. Rasik Raval worked in isolation, experimenting in folk idiom as he pulled away from confines of tradition to develop his own unique style. His stylized, elongated figures are rendered in flat, raw, elementary colours, a dramatic use of white and occasionally gold. His figures never crowd. Yet in his [Raval's] romanticism there is a sadness that almost escapes attention. The delightful sense of rhythm and nimble movement of dancers are typical of Raval's expressions of Joy. A tall burly man, abundantly genial, he collapsed while taking a morning walk with his friends on 22nd Oct 1980. And with him went the enchanted Tulsivan series he had planned. Submitted February, 2010 by Ullhas Chogle, whose source is Sudhir Rasik Raval, son of the artist." This drawing is in excellent, fresh, well preserved condition. The frame shown is available with it at no extra cost. The liner of that frame is soiled and the non glare glass needs to be discarded. .

Item ID: JB01658

RASIK DUGASHANKER RAVAL (1928-1980) South Asian art gouache drawing of stylized Indian female figures

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