Set of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courtingSet of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courting

Lovely trio of Limoges miniature plates with romantic scenes inspired by Rococo artist Jean Luis Fragonard (see signature at bottom of all three plates). Images were likely added to the plates via transfer (transfers are a type of decal that mimics hand decorating). Plates have hooks so they can be hung or they have an attached stand. In very good vintage condition with no chips or cracks - the plate in which the man wears a red jacket has a crack in the back that appears to be a flaw from production and which does not affect the image on the front of the plate. Plates measure 2" to 2 & 1/4" in diameter.

Jean-Honoré Fragonard from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French: 5 April 1732 – 22 August 1806) was a French painter and printmaker whose late Rococo manner was distinguished by remarkable facility, exuberance, and hedonism. One of the most prolific artists active in the last decades of the Ancien Régime, Fragonard produced more than 550 paintings (not counting drawings and etchings), of which only five are dated. Among his most popular works are genre paintings conveying an atmosphere of intimacy and veiled eroticism.
Jean-Honoré Fragonard was born at Grasse, Alpes-Maritimes, the son of François Fragonard, a glover, and Françoise Petit. Fragonard was articled to a Paris notary when his father's circumstances became strained through unsuccessful speculations, but showed such talent and inclination for art that he was taken at the age of eighteen to François Boucher. Boucher recognized the youth's rare gifts but, disinclined to waste his time with one so inexperienced, sent him to Chardin's atelier. Fragonard studied for six months under the great luminist, then returned more fully equipped to Boucher, whose style he soon acquired so completely that the master entrusted him with the execution of replicas of his paintings. Though not yet a student of the Academy, Fragonard gained the Prix de Rome in 1752 with a painting of Jeroboam Sacrificing to the Golden Calf, but before proceeding to Rome he continued to study for three years under Charles-André van Loo....While at Rome, Fragonard contracted a friendship with a fellow painter, Hubert Robert. In 1760, they toured Italy together, executing numerous sketches of local scenery. It was in these romantic gardens, with their fountains, grottos, temples and terraces, that Fragonard conceived the dreams which he was subsequently to render in his art....the demand of the wealthy art patrons of Louis XV's pleasure-loving and licentious court turned him definitely towards those scenes of love and voluptuousness....The French Revolution deprived Fragonard of his private patrons: they were either guillotined or exiled. The neglected painter deemed it prudent to leave Paris in 1790 and found shelter in the house of his cousin Alexandre Maubert at Grasse....Fragonard returned to Paris early in the nineteenth century, where he died in 1806, almost completely forgotten....For half a century or more he was so completely ignored that Wilhelm Lübke's 1873 art history volume omits the very mention of his name. Subsequent reevaluation has confirmed his position among the all-time masters of French painting. The influence of Fragonard's handling of local colour and expressive, confident brushstroke on the Impressionists (particularly his grand niece, Berthe Morisot, and Renoir) cannot be overestimated. Fragonard's paintings, alongside those of François Boucher, seem to sum up an era.

Limoges porcelain from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Limoges porcelain is hard-paste porcelain produced by factories in and around the city of Limoges, France beginning in the late 18th century, but does not refer to a particular manufacturer. By about 1830 Limoges, which was close to the areas where suitable clay was found, had replaced Paris as the main centre for private porcelain factories, although the state-owned Sèvres porcelain near Paris remained dominant at the very top of the market. Limoges has maintained this position to the present day.
Limoges had strong antecedents in the production of decorative objects. The city was the most famous European centre of vitreous enamel production in the 12th century, and Limoges enamel was known as Opus de Limogia or Labor Limogiae. Limoges had also been the site of a minor industry producing plain faience earthenware since the 1730s. The manufacturing of hard-paste porcelain at Limoges was established by Turgot in 1771 following the discovery of local supplies of kaolin and a material similar to petuntse in the economically distressed area at Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, near Limoges. The materials, which were quarried beginning in 1768, were used to produce hard-paste porcelain similar to Chinese porcelain. A manufactory at Limoges was placed under the patronage of the comte d'Artois, brother of Louis XVI, and was later purchased by the King in 1784, apparently with the idea of producing hard-paste bodies for decoration at Sèvres, although this never happened. After the French Revolution a number of private factories were established at Limoges, including Bernardaud, Haviland & Co. and Royal Limoges
Limoges maintains the position it established in the 19th century as the premier manufacturing city of porcelain in France.

Ceramic decal from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A ceramic decal is a transfer system that is used to apply pre-printed images or designs to ceramic tableware, ornamental ware and tiles, and glass containers.
A decal typically comprises three layers: the color, or image, layer which comprises the decorative design; the covercoat, a clear protective layer, which may incorporate a low-melting glass; and the backing paper on which the design is printed by screen printing or lithography. There are various methods of transferring the design while removing the backing-paper, some of which are suited to machine application.
The decal method is often used for the decoration of pottery. A special paper is used but the ceramic colours cannot be printed directly[citation needed] and the actual printing is done in varnish and the color then dusted on. The decal is placed colored side-down on the sized ware, rubbed firmly, and the paper then sponged off.
Equivalent terms
The term "ceramic decal" is an American equivalent to the British English terms "transfer" or "litho".

ITEM ID
PCL-6
STYLE
Louis XV, Rococo
COLOR
Gold, Rainbow
TYPE
Limoges
ORIGIN
France • French
PURPOSE
Decorator Plates
ITEM TYPE
Vintage

Set of three miniature Limoges Fragonard plates of couples courting

$50

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