Rare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stampRare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stampRare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stampRare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stampRare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stampRare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stamp

This lovely, sweet, French, artist signed, undivided back postcard by the preeminent Art Nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha features a pastel hued mother and child feeding birds. It was posted in 1906 from Baltimore to New York. The 1 cent Ben Franklin postage stamp is considered rare. This postcard is in Fair antique condition with light staining, writing impinging on the left side of the image, a creased right corner, a small crease midway on the right side of the card as well as at the top of the card, bumping and obvious soil and wear along the right edge of the verso. Given, however, the rarity and high desirability of any Alphonse Much early images coupled with the 1 cent Ben Franklin stamp, it is still a highly collectable card.

Alphonse Marie Mucha 1860-1939
Moravian, b. Ivancice (now Czech Republic)
From Metro Postcard
After being rejected by the Prague Academy, Mucha moved to Vienna and found work as an apprentice painting sets for the theater. When his best client, the Ring Theater burnt down he moved to Mikulov in 1881 supporting himself restoring portraits and painting murals. In 1885 he moved to Munich to attend the Academy there, followed by a move to Paris in 1887 where he attended the Academy Julian and then the Academy Colarassi. While there he briefly shared a studio with Paul Gaugin after his return from Tahiti. By 1894 Mucha was primarily working as a magazine illustrator but he also created many types of graphic art including postcards. These cards issued in an Art Nouveau style were largely re-designs of previous work done for posters, calendars, and menus. Mucha created these designs in black & white and it was the printer who added in color. At first this was carefully done under the supervision of the artist, but feeling exploited he took less care in their production over time. As the 19th century grew to a close, Mucha took part in the Vienna Secession and also published important style books such as Le Pater in 1899, but he also began to shed his highly stylized work in favor of more symbolic tendencies. His growing popularity allowed him to branch out into other fields such as designing stained glass and jewelry. Between 1904 and 1912 he traveled extensively to the United States, painting portraits and teaching in New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia. While in the States he met Charles R. Crane who agreed to finance Mucha’s lifelong ambition, the painting of the Slav Epic, a pictorial history of Slavonic culture. His interest in this project dated back to 1899 when he was commissioned to help create the Austrian Empire’s entry for the 1900 Paris Exposition. After returning to Prague he would spend the next sixteen years working on these twenty panels. He was somewhat distracted by designing postage stamps and money for the new Czech State in 1918. His dedication to Slav nationalism made him a target for the Gestapo after Germany invaded Czechoslovakia in 1939. He was quickly arrested and died soon after being released. Mucha’s Slav Epic appeared on old postcards as art reproductions, and most of his Art Nouveau designs continue to be reproduced on modern cards.

Series of 1902 (United States postage stamps)
Excerpted from Wikipedia
The Series of 1902, also known as the Second Bureau Issue, is a set of definitive postage stamps in fourteen denominations ranging between one cent and five dollars, produced by the U. S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing and issued by the United States Post Office. Two denominations appeared in November and December 1902 and the other twelve were released between January and June 1903. These stamps were assigned the Scott Catalogue numbers 300 through 313....This series, particularly noted for its exceptional ornateness and opulence of design, remained in circulation until late 1908, when it was superseded by the Washington-Franklin Issues....Also continued in the Series of 1902 was the use of the Universal Postal Union colors required of all member nations on stamps for post cards (green, 1¢), regular mail (red, 2¢) and international mail (blue, 5¢). These were meant to facilitate the easy handling of international mail and had been adopted for the final version of the First Bureau Issue in 1898.[13] Of the eleven remaining 1902 denominations, ten appeared in colors identical--or nearly identical--to those of their 1898 counterparts: only the 8¢ stamp was significantly different in hue. The oft-unusual iconography with which this series evokes the achievements of its famous Americans includes the following: for Franklin's electrical researches, light bulbs in the stamp's top corners....1¢ Green, Benjamin Franklin, issued February 3, 1903, designed by Raymond Ostrander Smith. From a painting by James B. Longacre. The engravers were George F. C. Smillie (portrait and flanking sculptural male figures holding light bulbs aloft), Robert F. Ponickau (frame) and Lyman F. Ellis (lettering and numerals). The imperforate version appeared on October 2, 1906, booklets of six 1¢ stamps were issued on March 1, 1907, the vertical coil was released on February 2, 1908 followed by the horizontal coil on July 31, 1908.

ITEM ID
PC-324
COLOR
Pink, Turquoise
ITEM TYPE
Antique

Rare Mucha Undivided back French Mother/Child postcard with rare Ben Franklin one cent stamp

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