Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine,  C. 1904

Both pieces are marked and are sterling silver. The perfume container was made by Walker and Hall and bears the Sheffield (assay) mark, the sterling silver mark (lion), and the date letter which is C. 1904, the date of the container. The fact that the stopper is with the bottle is a huge plus. The bottle has a cork with a silver top, not a dauber for applying perfume which indicates a decanter for a smaller carried bottle.

Size: 4 and 1/2 inches. (A bit more with the stopper)

Condition: The overall condition is as you would expect from an object of substantial age that has been displayed/handled/used, usually over the lifetimes of several owners. Please refer to photos. They are not retouched.

Circa: 1904.

George Walker secured a patent in 1848 for electroplating silver. In 1853, he was joined by Henry Hall to form Walker and Hall, Sheffield, producers of sterling, electroplate and nickel silver. By 1900, the firm was one of the largest silver manufacturers in England with some quantities of wares arriving in the United States. In 1920, it became a part of British Silverware Ltd.

Perfume containers are an important part of world culture since ancient times and were made of stone by the Egyptians. The Ancient Greeks made hand painted vases in the shape of animals for perfume containers. The early Europeans used glass, gold, silver, porcelain, semi-precious stones and shells. Some European perfume containers were designed to be worn and were handcrafted and designed by artists, jewelers and goldsmiths and silversmiths. Inconsequential wooden boxes were created to purchase a wipe soaked with perfume. These boxes would fit inside a pocket and could be taken out and inhaled at any time. Perfume bottles made a dramatic change in the 1800's to the Art Nouveau style and during the 1910's, the shift in the traditional bottle rapidly changed to what we see today. Prior to the 20th century, many women would either mix their own perfume or would buy them from the local perfumer. These would be decanted into bottles which would be refilled over and over. Like these bottles, they were usually larger than modern examples and were intended to hold a woman's stock of perfume which she would decant into smaller bottles to fit into her purse. These perfume bottles were made either in England or Australia in the 1900's.

Item ID: A5160


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Sterling Silver Perfume Bottle With Chatelaine, C. 1904

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