Navajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise BoloNavajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise Bolo

Hello and thank you for your interest in our inventory. Today up for your consideration is this WONDERFUL Sterling Silver with High Grade Morenci Turquoise Channel Inlay Bolo. This Bolo was made by Multi Award Winner and World Renowned Navajo Silversmiths Carl & Irene Clark. The interesting thing is the design is in the style of Zuni silversmiths Annie Quam Gasper and Ellen Quandelacy. The image is a Hummingbird motif. The back of the bolo is decorated with stampwork and has Carl & Irene’s hallmark in the upper left side. There is a black leather braided strap with sterling tips. (Strap and tips not made by artists). I personal contacted Carl to confirm that he and Irene made the Bolo. He confirmed that they did indeed make it.

Ref., American Indian Jewelry II: A-L 1800 Artist Biographies BY GREGORY SCHAFF ASSISTED BY ANGIE YAN SCHAAF

Carl Clark, Sr. (stamped hallmark with initials), (collaborates with Irene Clark) (Navajo, Many Goats Clan, active 1973-present: gold, silver, mosaic, micro-inlay jewelry)

BORN: April 10, 1952, Winslow, AZ

RESIDENCE: Phoenix, AZ

FAMILY: great-grandson of She-she-nez; m. grandson of Zonnie Nez; son of Modesta Elthossie Clark & adopted son of Edgar Clark; brother of Don Clark, Earl Dixon, Rose Ann Roberts, Raymond Dixon, Carol Florez, Emory Dixon, Gilbert Dixon, Milton Dixon, Melissa Franklin, William Dixon; husband of Irene Clark; father of Carl Clark, Jr., Angela Yvonne Clark, Jennifer Jeannette Clark, Tanya Vanessa Douglas

AWARDS: Hundreds of awards, incl. 1985, Best of Class, Santa Monica Indian Art Show, CA; 2002, 3rd, Indian Market, Santa Fe; 2002, 3rd, mosaic rings, Intertribal Indian Ceremonial, Gallup, NM

EXHIBITIONS: 1980s-present, Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ; 1997-present, Indian Market, Santa Fe; 2002, "Jewels of the Southwest," Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Santa Fe; 2002, "Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 1," American Craft Museum, New York, NY

COLLECTIONS: Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ; Kitty Steinman; Helen Kersting Collection, Eiteljorg Museum; Mary Lou Wolfson, Dr. Gregory & Angie Schaaf

PUBLICATIONS: Turnbaugh 1988:71; Cirillo 1992:186-89, 230, 232; Cirillo 1995, 2008; American Indian Art Magazine Autumn 1993:40; Bassman 1994, 1997; Jacka 1994:126, 163, 166; 1995:99; Pardue 1996; Indian Trader Jan. 1997:9; Wright 2000:51; McGough 2002:41; McFadden & Taubman 2002:194, 202-03; Schaaf 2003:116; Pardue 2007; “Traditionally Modern,” Heyoka Magazine 2009.

Carl and Irene Clark are among the greatest Indian jewelers in history. They are famous for their fine micro-inlay jewelry. The first piece we collected by them was a beautiful ring. We were amazed by the quality of the artistry. We finally met Carl and Irene at the 2002 Indian Market in Santa Fe and commissioned them to do a larger pendant. Carl shared how he got started in Indian art: "In 1968-73, I made Katsina dolls. I was attending college when I received a summer job at an arts & crafts gallery in Winslow, AZ. I was the supply man. I logged in the jewelry for about 19 jewelers. He then made me manager of the store for a year. I made friends with the jewelers and started making jewelry myself. I really enjoyed making jewelry. I started making Navajo-style jewelry full time. During 1973 to 1975, I conceived a new style of jewelry incorporating the styles of three Indian nations - Navajo, Hopi & Zuni. By 1975, I started micro-inlay. My first piece was a big heavy oval shaped ring. I made it sideways to look like a tornado. In inlay I made a hogan and abstract sunrays. I sold it for $75, and I was so happy. Today, it would be worth about $1,900. I came up with the classification, "micro fine intarsia inlay." In 1976, we moved to Phoenix and started researching in the library. We found in the 1700s in Italy, there was a fine inlayer name Fortuno Pio Castelenni. He had two sons, and they did fine religious scenes. They sold to kings and queens and were renowned. Another group was in Japan who made fine inlay in the Art Deco period, ca. 1930s-50s. In 1977, I entered my first micro fine inlay piece at Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial, in Gallup, NM.” Jewelry specialist Gene Waddell commented: "The Clark's are self-taught, contemporary Native American jewelry artists who combine their artistic sense of beauty with the outstanding skill of craftsmanship to design and to create intricate jewelry. Their masterpieces are created in gold and silver featuring micro-fine intarsia inlay . . . to resemble a watercolor painting. One bracelet often will possess five to six thousand stones."

Inventory #: 566NAV125

Size: - Bolo L. 2 5/8" x W. 1 3/4" – Strap Length 22.5"

Weight: 68.7g

Circa: 1980s

Artist/Hallmark: Carl & Irene Clark

Condition: Excellent Vintage Condition,

PLEASE be sure to add us as one of your FAVORITE SHOPS, you will be notified as we update our inventory.

Item ID: 566NAV125


Gender: Unisex, Age Group: Adult, Color: Silver/Blue, Size: Bolo L. 2 5/8" x W. 1 3/4" – Strap Length 22.5"

Navajo, Carl & Irene Clark Sterling and High Grade Turquoise Bolo

$716 USD REDUCED

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Sill Tribal Trading & Kjuneo Jewelry


Douglas Sill
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Specializing in vintage & antique Native American art & fun vintage jewelry.

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