11th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 187811th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 1878

A 1878 Tract by the Shakers called 'The Shaker Manifesto'. It's a very interesting read. Shakers were well known and well thought of in their day; considered innovators in furniture making and machine making. They were also great horticulturists and used the mail to send flower and vegetable seeds all over the world. This tract has lectures, musings, advertising--as they were 'Godly capitalists'--and songs. I love the images, and the argument about Shakers vs Girlingites. I can't imagine a religion called Girlingites. I'm going to have to look that up. It sounds like a female rock band.

The tract is about 20 pages although it is counted up into the 200s because it's part of serialized tracts sent every month. This is an original 'Shaker Manifesto'; very rare to find. And it's in excellent condition; no rips, tears, stains or smells. It's creased a bit in the middle, as if someone long ago had folded it. I have had it open for many years and the crease is barely noticeable.

Brief information on the Shakers: They were a millenarian restorationist Christian sect that began in England, led by Mother Ann Lee. She left England in 1744 for the colonies and Shakers set up communities in New York state and Maine. They were also called, 'The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing’. The End Of The World was a gripping concern for the Shakers, as they prepared the way for Jesus' Second Coming by living exemplary lifestyles and following unique beliefs based on Biblical teachings.

They were called the "Shaking Quakers" because of their ecstatic movements during services. Women assumed leadership roles within the sect; Pacifism and equality of the sexes, as well as practicing a celibate and communal lifestyle of simplicity, would lead them to happiness on Earth and Heaven after death. That purity and simplicity is seen in their architecture, basket weaving, furniture, their recipes and their horticulture, and in their distinctive way of dress.

I researched and as of 2011, there was one active Shaker village left in central Maine. There were three members. Other existing Shaker villages are all museums. They should have left out that celibate part.

Item ID: GFU00233

11th Volume of 'The Shaker Manifesto' - 1878

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