1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear

Original advertising cardboard box with partial contents containing 3 pairs of "Vellastic" children's knit pants from The Utica Knitting Company, Utica, New York. The Utica Knitting Company was founded in 1872 and by the turn of the century had become the nation's leading producer of knitwear. In the very early 1900's the company purchased the equipment of a small box company and moved it to their plant to make their own boxes. At the time they were using from 1600 to 2000 boxes a day. The mill production continued under the Utica Knitting Company name until a buy out in 1951.

This box is in excellent vintage condition showing only very minor soiling, spotting and wear. The applied paper label graphic of the family sitting in the parlor wearing their "Vellastic" underwear is stunning. Under the graphic it says "UNDERWEAR FOR EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY". The box contains 3 pairs of original never sold---never worn children's knit pants. This wonderful box with its partial original contents is one of the most delightful vintage advertising collectibles we have in our store.

Circa 1920's, dimensions 10" x 8 3/4" x 5"

Item ID: 0769

1920's Advertising Box of "Vellastic" Children's Knit Underwear

$225

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