Japanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, EachJapanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, Each

These Japanese antique Imari 伊万里焼 porcelain crane dishes date to the mid-1800's Edo period. Tsuru 鶴 They were a purchase from a Japanese dealer. The fine white Imari 'jiki' or porcelain has been handmade and the porcelain hand formed by a potter before being painted and placed in the kiln. They have an unusual 'curved rim' polygonal shape. These Imari dishes are skillfully hand drawn and hand painted with a summer mountain and landscape background. Six cranes on each plate, three fly in the sky and three are on the ground who appear to be bowing under the pine trees. The cranes are made in an unusual style. This Imari is decorated in underglaze colors with many bright overglaze enamels. Sailboats sit on the bank of the lake and one sails in the distance. A blue-green border surrounds these uniquely decorated dishes. It is called 'rinpo' and resembles the tassle border of window tapestry. The backs are decorated in an underglaze blue arabesque scrolling design of a leaf. The foot is surrounded in three -ao or blue borders with one on the inside of the foot. The foot or kodai is tall indicative of an older piece.

These are in very good condition, no cracks. There are chips to the foot of one plate, and I am happy to share pictures of the third not pictured. The buyer can choose their plate(s). There is some minor age wear to the surface but still holding their color vibrancy. Stands are not included but we are happy to help you find one if needed. These old ko-Imari dishes with rare painting would make both a wonderful decorating and conversation piece.

SIZE: Width 6.3 inches or 16 cm, Length 5.5 inches or 13.97 cm, Height 1.4 inches or 3.55 cm. Weight 200 grams or 0.44 of a pound each

Imari porcelain

Imari porcelain 伊万里焼 is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. The Japanese, as well as Europeans, called them Imari. In Japanese, these porcelains are also known as Arita-yaki 有田焼. Imari was the trans-shipment port for Arita wares. There are many styles including Nabeshima and Kakiemon. It was the kilns at Arita which formed the heart of the Japanese porcelain industry.

Though sophisticated wares in authentic Japanese styles were being made at Arita for the fastidious home market, European–style designations of Arita porcelain were formed after blue and white kraak porcelains, imitating Chinese underglaze blue-and-white wares, or made use of enamel colors over underglazes of cobalt blue and iron red. The ware often used copious gilding, sometimes with spare isolated sprigged vignettes, but often densely patterned in compartments.

Imari or Arita porcelain has been continually produced up to the present day.

Item ID: A971


Always Combined Shipping! International shipping: 25% on orders of $100 USD or moreI

Japanese Antique Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Rare Tsuru 鶴 Dishes, Each

$67 $49 USD ea. REDUCED

Quantity available: 3
Add to Cart
Questions about this item?
Email Shop

8 other shoppers have this item in their Cart or Wish List


The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin
TX
  

Japanese Antique and Vintage Pottery, Porcelain, Netsuke, Masks, Okimono, Tea Items, Jewelry & More!

Thank you for visiting! Please see Important announcements on our Main page including our Sales!

Exclusive Ruby Lane Member since 2013

calculating shipping...

More from The Many Faces of Japan