Japanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of DaikokuJapanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Daikoku

Japanese antique Hirado Ware porcelain okimono or statue of Daikoku was made by the Hirado kilns of Nagasaki. It is 120 years old dating to the Meiji period. According to the Japanese dealer who is very knowledgeable, it is Hirado ware. It is handmade and hand formed with great detail, and glazed in green and black, some of the rarest colors used for Hirado ware, this is the old type Hirado ware not made for export. We have two of similar okimono we have had for some time in our collection, in that they are very old and were not made for export. Green and black are both rare colors known to be used on Hirado and as mentioned in the book on Hirado, Prince of Porcelains. Daikoku represents the Japanese God of Earth, Agriculture, Rice, Farmers, the Kitchen, and Wealth. It is in very good antique condition with one chip to the happy Daikoku's hammer, otherwise in excellent condition. He is a moderately heavy piece with good form and character.

SIZE: Height 6.2" or 15.74 cm, Length 4.5" or11.43 cm, Depth 3.7" or 9.39 cm, Weight Grams 760 grams or 1.67 pounds prepacked

The Story of Daikoku 大黒天

The Daikoku is frequently depicted in Japanese art carrying the hammer or sometimes a knife. There are many stories on the internet and following are excerpts from a trusted source. The origin is India. Daikokuten 大黒天 literally means Great Black Deva and depending on the Shinto Association can be called a variation of the name as mentioned. Daikoku is the God of Earth, Agriculture, Rice, Farmers, the Kitchen, & Wealth. One of Japan's Seven Lucky Gods, he is associated with the virtue of fortune. I am hoping by posting this he will send some my way, excerpts from Wiki.

Historical Notes, a Very Brief Excerpt of a Very Long History of Daikoku 大黒 From the Japanese Buddhist Statuary:

Daikokuten or Daikoku is widely known in Japan as the happy-looking god of wealth, farmers, food, and good fortune, although in earlier centuries he was considered a fierce warrior deity. The oldest extant image of Daikokuten in Japan is dated to the late Heian period 794-1185 and installed at Kanzeonji Temple Fukuoka prefecture. The statue depicts the deity with a fierce expression, reminding us of his Hindu origin as a war god, as does the late-Heian sculpture of Daikoku at Kongōrinji Temple Shiga prefecture, which shows him dressed in armor.

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Item ID: A766


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Japanese Antique Hirado Ware Japanese Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Daikoku

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The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin
TX
  

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