Japanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro EirakuJapanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro Eiraku

This is a beautiful Japanese porcelain ware covered bowl Kashiki, made by Great Zengoro Eiraku, with the stamp of the Shozen used during the time of 1880-1932. Kashiki is the name for the item most often use in tea ceremonies for serving cookies and desserts and such but may have many other uses. This is considered a high class kashiki in Japan. It is handmade and painted with traditional design in flowers and butterflies of red, green and blue based on an old Kutani design, I believe. While we also sometimes see similar designs in Japanese wares with the newer including other Kyo ware styles, this is an older one although not as old as the original design was used.

This pattern is similar to one which historically came from China, while now we see different interpretations on Japanese wares in a different style with the same color scheme, I have recently learned and thanks to a friend, sharing - They were originally produced by 平和窑 Ping he Yao, Fujian in between 1573 -- 1644 Late Ming... These wares were then exported to Japan and Europe together with Klaak shipments, and today in Japan they call the style the Great Ming Wucai. The maker of this kashiki is 15th generation Zengoro Eiraku 1863~1937. In Japan, there are ten specialists who make tea utensils for the tea ceremony school called Senke Jisshoku; and Eiraku is one of them. Please see our other items by this family of potters in our store and the extended history below of this potter family. We have a Kyoto Ware coffee or teapot in a different patterned red and green which would be very lovely together for coffee and desserts.

SIZE: Square 6.4” or 16.25 cm, Height 3.5 or 8.25 cm. Weight 600 grams or 1.32 pounds unpacked

With the exception of some chips to the Kodai or foot of the kashiki, it is in excellent aged condition for 80 years of age, please see the pictures. It does not cause any instability. Please see the pictures and ask any questions. We are non-house smokers and do not smoke around our wares and our very careful with them to have clean hands and in the packing. We have noticed smells from items received recently, again please let us know if you have any questions. This one has no smells, this is from a well- known and honest, quality antiques dealer's piece.

Please visit our store of over 700 Japanese items, porcelain, pottery, ceramics, netsuke, statues or okimono, metalware, lacquerware, wood works, and more!

The following incredible history of this potter's background and his family is from The Kutani Ceramic Website and written by renowned expert Georges Bouvier. A link to his wonderful and extensive site can be found under our Favorites Links on our Home Page.

Eiraku Zengoro Wazen 永楽 善五郎和全

This potter family goes back around 1540 in Nara where a potter named Nishimura Soin and usually called Zengoro was quite famous. Before talking about Eiraku Wazen the 12th generation of potter, it is very important to describe the activities of his father Zengoro Hozen 保全 1795-1854 the 11th who has mastered the secret of the porcelain of the Ming Dynasty. He was extremely good at several techniques such as blue and white sometsuke, under the glaze porcelains copies of Chinese Kochi and also Kinrande which is a gold decoration on red ground. He was also good at copies of Celadon and Korean wares. He is known as the first Japanese to master the technique of Kinrande. He is also the first Zengoro to be named Eiraku. He devoted the end of his life and most of his fortune in trying to improve the technique of porcelain. At that time he instructed his son Wazen and transferred the family business to him. He died in 1854.

Zengoro the 12th is born in 1823, and inherited his father business in Kyoto in 1853. He adopted the name Eiraku during Meiji period. Wazen was excellent both at painting and at calligraphy but he inherited a business which had some financial problems due to his father research in perfecting his art.

In 1860, Maeda Toshika the 14th Lord of Daishoji established the Bussan Office a sort of Chamber of Commerce, in order to expand the local business. At the same times he bought the Miyamoto kiln which had been closed few years ago and renamed it Kutanihon. But the result was not very good and Lord Maeda decided in 1862 to invite Eiraku Wazen 永楽 和全 the 12th from Kyoto. But it took some time, and Wazen 和全 came to Yamashiro village 山代村 with his brother in law called Nishimura Sozaburo 西村 宗三郎 only in 1866.

Wazen was very active in the kilns in Etchudani , now Yamashiro. He made there a lot of pottery as well as in the kiln of his pupil Manki in the Kisaki kiln. He works also at Matsuyama Kiln just before going back to Kyoto. Wazen trained also Okura Juraku. From this period where Wazen was living in Yamashiro, they are many things remaining. Wazen stayed at Tokuya Inn who belonged to Mitsufuji Bunjiro and did pottery and painting. He had a very special character and was a very good master but he only concentrated on his work and did not worried about any material consideration. When his 3 years contract was completed, the money which he had received at the beginning was all spent and he could not return to Kyoto. It is said that he could not even buy rice to return! Therefore he had to stay longer and finally, in 1869, after 5 years, he returned to Kyoto. He had stayed only a short period in Yamashiro area, but he has left many marks, as he had an individual testy style for Iga , Nanban, copies of Korean wares, Kinrande 金欄手, Gosuakae red paint, Manteki which is a Chinese style, sometsuke etc. Among the traditional Kutani painting, he has introduced a new style as he was a master of Kyo-yaki 京焼. But Wazen as a manufacturer and teacher of pottery was certainly superior, but as said before for Kutanihon kiln and for the production in general, he did nothing special. He died in 1896, he was 73 years old. The names used for Wazen production are made at Kasugayama by Zengoro, made by Eiraku at Kasugayama, made at Kutani by Eiraku. He also used stamps such as Kasugayama or Eiraku.

Also for making of wood boxes, he came from Kyoto with a master in wood boxes. At that times, there were many boxes which are marked with burning stamp as [椿斎] Chin Sai.

Please let us know if you have any questions. See our homepage for more information about our family, store and announcements.

Item ID: A742


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Japanese Vintage Porcelain Kashiki Covered Bowl by the Great Zengoro Eiraku

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Sharon Meredith
Austin, TX   

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