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The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith, Austin, TX   

Japanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa IIJapanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa II
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A Japanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery kogo or case was made by famous potter Seiho Samukawa at his aoi-gama or kiln about 40 years ago. It was made at the famous artist kiln / studio, the aoi-gama of Seiho Samukawa . A kogo is a small Japanese box most often used to hold rolled incense balls in the traditional tea ceremony, the temple and home. Kogo also make wonderful decorative objects or to hold other small items in as well as collectors items. A round kogo is made by 'tebineri' or hand molded with tje great form of a rabbit as a decorative finial. It is then hand painted and then hand glazed. It is very well made with very nice warm neutral colors. It come with the original signed box or the tomobako which is the box made especially for an item of art). This specific style tomobako box is a Shiho- zan and considered of a high quality because the lid has an inside lip that helps it fit securely. It is a very important piece to have for the value and future care and storage of the item. It is signed by the potter with the name of the kiln, the potter name and mark. This lovely artist made kogo is in very good condition with no chips or cracks. It does have some minor crazing to the glaze which is not uncommon. This is a lovely, wonderful art pottery kogo.

SIZE: Diameter 2.5" or 6.35 cm, Height 2,2" or 5.58 cm

The Potter

This artist is Seiho Samukawa II b. 1946 -. He took his father's name in 1976. This was made at his aoi- gama or kiln and is a very famous old kiln. Other types of pottery and porcelains are also made at this kiln including Seto ware. Seiho Samukawa is a very famous artist in Japan and his work has been awarded including those with the traditional blessings by a monk. Seiho plays an active role in ongoing re-building and development at the famous Aoi-gama or kiln. He has made many other items for tea ceremony and is a famous potter in Japan. Kisshu 紀州 is the pottery of Wakayama Prefecture in Japan and is very old traditional Japanese pottery. We have now added the link to his website in our Favorites links on our homepage! From his Bio page, just an excerpt follows. Please see the rest there about both Seiho, as well as more on history and the current collection:

About his father: Seiho studied pottery techniques under Mr. Sozan Sawada, a well-known potter. In 1932, he opened his first pottery atelier at Koyaguchi-Odawara in Wakayama Prefecture after working for 5 years as a chief manager at Aichi Prefectural Institute of Ceramic Industry. Mr. Yorisada Tokugawa, the former lord of the Kishu Domain, was very concerned about the demise of Kishu pottery following the end of the Domain System and was looking for a person who would be able to revive it. Mr. Tokugawa met Seiho, found his works outstanding and asked him to revive the Kishu pottery tradition. Seiho was deeply touched by Mr. Tokugawa’s enthusiasm and determined to dedicate his life to this project. He was given the name for his pottery atelier, Aoi-Gama, by Mr. Tokugawa. (Aoi, a hollyhock, is the family crest of the Tokugawas.)

More about Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kilns and History

Kishu Pottery appears to have a famous yet not well-known history in the U.S. according to what little I could find on the internet dating back to the beginning of the 18th century. There was nothing immediately published on the internet about Kishu but an old article is found in the Journal of Society of Arts dated February 26, 1892; dedicated to Kishu pottery and development of and old kiln that I suspect is the ow very old Aoi Kiln. There is also some discussion in an old book Japan, is History Arts and Literature by Frank Brinkley from the 1800s. The history of the area is mostly unrecorded and not known per Frank Brinkley. In the 1800s Kishu pottery was then Oniwa yaki or Kairaku yaki but made at a kiln in Kushi Japan. The first kiln was built on the site of the former home of the family that governed the district. According to the article, at the beginning of the 18th century. This was a private and family kiln or gama. The key ceramist at this time's name was Zengoro Hozen, brought back by the head of the family Tokugawa Harunori, from Kyoto. At that time, Kishu yaki underwent a significant change in designs of its pottery including the use of bright colors including purple yellow blue and white. This is the first in history there is record of these type colors being used that early in Japan. This pottery was said to have been fashioned after a Chinese pottery some 4,000 years prior. There were many old kilns undergoing revival at this time by 20th-century potters, as above and see more at his site.

Item ID: A616


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Japanese Vintage Kishu 紀州 Pottery Kogo or Case by Potter Seiho Samukawa II

$113 USD SOLD

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The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin, TX   

Japanese Antique and Vintage Pottery, Porcelain, Netsuke, Masks, Okimono, Tea Items, Jewelry & More!

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