Japanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara IshiharaJapanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara Ishihara

Japanese vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of a Hoso-mizusashi by Takara Ishihara was made about 30 years ago, according to the dealer and my friend in Japan. A 'Hoso-mizusashi' is one made for the fall, tall and slim in warm colors. 'Hoso' means 'narrow'. The mizusashi are the cold water container for tea ceremonies. They are used for both replenishing the water in the tea kettle, and later rinsing the tea ceremony utensils or the chasen bamboo whisk that is used to make the tea. In the Western home, they make wonderful decorative containers for the kitchen or just about anywhere in the home. They are made to hold foods and can be left out or placed in the refrigerator for a short period but should never be placed in a dishwasher. Shido-yaki is written 志度焼 in Japanese. The kiln name or gama where this was made is named 'Monyagama' written 門家窯.

A gorgeous tall, slim mizusashi was handmade by the potter with Japanese clay. Light comb patterns were made from top to bottom around the sides as it spun on the potter's wheel. A beautiful acorn is delicately formed into the finial on the top. It is glazed in beautiful warm browns and gold. AN indentation on the lower part is either decorative or utilitarian to put a finger for steadying the piece. According to the note on the website from the potter below, this is a one of a kind piece as all of their items are. It reminds me a bit of Bizen-yaki but it is Shido-yaki. With a history dating back to the 1700,s in 1975 this potter went back to his hometown to help revive the craft of Shido. Very beautiful.

It is signed with the potter's mark on the bottom of the pottery which is an abbreviation for his last name. The other signatures which are hard to read, but in one part says ' congratulations, best wishes or a long life', then mentions a hermitage or hut. In this case it means a place where an artist, poet or someone who chose the life of monk style lives. 石原 宝 is the kanji for the potter's surname Ishihara. The box is signed and stamped in red with the potter's name, the kiln name, and name of the type of item. Thank you, Nancy Cowans and Kenneth Byron for helping with the interpretation. Thank you Sue Lynn Takagi for helping me find the website for the potter and kiln.
Normally, the name of the kiln will then be on the top right and the name of the item in the center. It also comes with the biography sheet of the potter and kiln. Most likely I already have the same information as in the biography translated as mentioned below, and happy to share with the buyer of this great piece.

This was the first time I have heard of or seen Shido pottery so was excited to add another one to our list. It is in excellent vintage condition with no cracks or chips and has been well cared for.

Size: Height 9.0 inches or 22.9 cm, Diameter 4.4 inches or 11.3 cm. Weight 3 lbs 1 oz or 1390 grams for both the mizusashi and tomobako.

Shido Pottery

According to the book 'Japan: Its History, Arts, and Literature' by Frank Brinkley written in the very early 1900's, Shido-yaki has been made since 1766. According to Brinkley's book, a 'factory' was located in the Kagawa District which opened in 1803, and 'their faience was locally known as Shido-yaki or Yashima-yaki after the old battlefield where the clay was procured'. Now the Kagawa Prefecture, Shido ware or -yaki is made on the island of Shikoku.

Master Potter Takara Ishihara 石原 宝

1948 Born in Shido Town, Kagawa Prefecture 1948
1967 Graduated from Takamatsu Craft High School, Kagawa Prefecture
1973 Japan Design School in Tokyo.
1975 Going home to Okinawa, Shuri
1976 Going home and reviving Shido-yaki

His list of exhibitions and awards are too many to list here, in 1981 this included Honoring the Imperial Court and Princess Michiko for offering tea bowls and flower arrangements. In summary, his exhibitions included: food container exhibition, flower container exhibition, Jomon swimming exhibition, primitive melody exhibition, interesting instrument exhibition, forest melody exhibition, forest light exhibition, forest carnival exhibition, a two-person exhibition with dyed sculptor and sculptor.

Of the kiln and gallery, he describes: The exhibition is designed to create an atmosphere according to the seasons. As its name suggests, the atmosphere in the forest is adorned with cute animals, and seasonal food vessels and flower vessels filled with fun are on display. A gallery space handcrafted using driftwood, old wood, and stones collected along the way. The ancient letters written by a friend, the lacquered lacquer coating, and accessories are also on display. The zodiac is also popular because it is handmade and does not have the same shape. I also love lighting with pottery and make mysterious lighting fixtures, Fish and cactus-like objects ... This is an image of the primitive. There is also a cord pendant shade. There is no one thing that is the same in all production.

Most likely the biography includes the complete Bio list that I have not included here. This comes with this piece and includes all the information found here as well already interpreted and not included, and we will be happy to share the rest that is translated with the buyer.

Item ID: A2288


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Japanese Vintage Shido -yaki Pottery of Hoso-Mizusashi by Takara Ishihara

$179


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