Japanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki VaseJapanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki Vase

Japanese antique Kyo-yaki pair of enameled cloisonne kabin or vase was made during the Japanese Meiji period of 1868-1912 and is about 100 years old. Shippo- yaki is the Japanese word for cloisonne wares. Kyo-yaki is the words for ceramic wares made in the city of Kyoto, Japan and refers to the type first then the Kyoto name second which were made in Japan during the old days. although still used on vintage and modern wares.

This pair of vases is absolutely gorgeous. The red enameled background is very rich. The delicately made cloisonne flowers and birds are beautiful with a gorgeous combination of colors in purple, lilac, and shades of white.

There is a repaired area on the top shoulder but placed just right is hard to see. there is a pressure point place on the shoulder of the other vase, please see the picture. Other than those two spots it is in very fine and displayable condition.

Size: Height 12 inches or 30.48 cm

Article from Wall Street Journal Shippo: Cloisonné Radiance of Japan
27 JUL 2013 by ALMA REYES

Excerpt

Emerald, crystal, agate, coral, pearl, gold, and silver—these are the seven auspicious treasures -’shippo’- described in the Buddhist sutra that aesthetically profess the essence of true beauty, which have been identified with Shippo, the traditional craft of Japanese cloisonné.

The history of cloisonné goes as far as the Silk Road, traveling busily from Southeast Europe, China and finally to Japan. Archeological cloisonné enamel treasures were discovered in Japanese ancient mound tombs in the 7th century, and since then, had spread rapidly throughout the country, settling in Aichi Prefecture as the seat of production. It was during the Paris International Exposition in 1867 when Japanese cloisonné wares debuted for international exposure, displaying traditional Japanese art forms, porcelain dinnerware, Rococo plates, art glass, lacquer, pottery, and mixed metal decorative pieces. From this trade fair, Japanese artists and manufacturers brought home decorative European objects, Victorian enamelware, and other ceramics, which consequently blended with the traditional Shippo.

Some individual craftsmen emerged as master cloisonne innovators and artisans with their own reputable studios. Japanese cloisonne of the Meiji period, from 1877 to 1912 became the most sought after ever, enjoying a golden era lasting close to 40 years

These vases were made using one of the following techniques. most likely the Totai-Shippo.

Dei-Shippo is used when describing opaque, matte enamels prior to the development of the brighter enamels. Dei-shippo pieces were made in bulk during the 1868-1912 periods and there are still a lot of antique pieces available. The pieces were made with a synthetic glaze.

Totai-Shippo are wares that have part of their bodies cut away and then those parts are filled with semi-translucent or translucent enamel. This provides a fantastic contrast between the opaque enamel that the rest of the piece is covered in. The effect is very similar to stained glass.

Item ID: A2284

Japanese Antique Pair of Kyo-yaki Enameled Cloisonne Shippo-yaki Vase

$325

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