Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds'  雲 龍

Fine Japanese Edo period Sometsuke Imari porcelain pair of dish are decorated with the auspicious Dragon- or Ryu-. These were made during the late Edo period of 1800-1868 according to my dealer from japan, .Sometsuke irefers to the very popular underglaze cobalt blue on white porcelain in Japanese and Chinese ceramics.

The work of a skilled Imari craftsman and ceramicist has made this par of dishes. They are hand-formed on a wheel into a sweet bowl of the namasu size for daily use, the name cover sizes of 5.9- 7.25 inches. A scalloped rim and side, Ir is trimmed in the traditional brown trim called Kuchibeni, a brown color trim and method to apply iron glaze on the rim of the plate or the bowl. The design on the inside of the bottom is called 'snake eyes' or 'bull's-eye' and indicative of the 1800's Edo period, with a tall foot and indented is drawn. Finally, the inside is decorated in underglaze blue with the very lovely 'Unryu' or 'dragon in clouds' 雲 龍

The Imari bowls are in excellent condition with no cracks or chips.

Size Diameter5.6-5.8 inches or 14.8-15 cm, Height 1.7 inches or 4.4 cm. Weight 1.1 lbs each or 00 grams each.

Imari porcelain 伊万里焼き

Imari porcelain is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. The Japanese as well as Europeans called them Imari. In Japanese, these porcelains are also known as Arita-yaki '有田焼'

Imari was simply the transshipment port for Arita wares. There are many styles of Imari, including Nabeshima and Kakiemon. It was the kilns at Arita which formed the heart of the Japanese porcelain industry.

Though sophisticated wares in authentic Japanese styles were being made at Arita for the fastidious home market, European–style designations of Arita porcelain were formed after blue and white kraak porcelains, imitating Chinese underglaze 'blue-and-white' wares, or made use of enamel colors over underglazes of cobalt blue and iron red. These wares often used copious gilding, sometimes with spare isolated sprigged vignettes, but often densely patterned in compartments.

Imari or Arita porcelain has been continually produced up to the present day. See more history of Imari on Gotheborg's, and through the several links to other Imari sites in our Favorites Links on our Homepage and so much more in many books that can also be found on the internet.

Item ID: A2283


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Fine Japanese Edo Period Sometsuke Imari Porcelain Dish with Dragon in clouds' 雲 龍

$129


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