Japanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku OkimonoJapanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain  Ebisu and Daikoku Okimono

A Japanese vintage fine Hirado white porcelain representing an okimono of Ebisu and Daikoku of the Seven Lucky Gods. Okimono 置物 is a Japanese term meaning 'ornament for display or decorative object', and typically displayed in a tokonoma alcove or butsudan, a Buddhist altar in the home. The Seven Lucky Gods are called 'the Shichifukujin' 七福神.

the Shichifukujin' 七福神 include Hotei, the fat and happy god of abundance and good health. Jurōjin, god of long life. Fukurokuju, god of happiness, wealth and longevity. Bishamonten, god of warriors. Benzaiten or Benten-sama, goddess of knowledge, art and beauty, especially music. Daikokuten or Daikoku, god of wealth, commerce and trade. Ebisu and Daikoku are often paired and represented as carvings or masks on the walls of small retail shops. Ebisu, god of fishers or merchants, often depicted carrying a sea bream.

Hirado is one of the most coveted of all the Japanese export porcelains in the Western world and other countries and considered to be porcelain of prestige in Japan. Hirado has a long history with the delicate blue and white pieces exported during the Meiji period being among the most familiar and the most popular. The porcelain is very fine and to this day their formula for making it remains a mysterious secret. This piece is very well made with great detail by the Hirado artist. The bends and folds lifelike and the big smiles contagious. Each statue is formed separately yet connect together as one and stand with stability, It would make an excellent shelf or display piece and is a fine collector's item of Hirado..

This is a very fine near- antique age Hirado statue yet it seems brand new. It is 80 years old. The previous owners have taken good care of it, It is in excellent condition with no cracks or chips.

Size: Height 7.7 inches or 19.5 cm, Width 6.9 inches or 17.5 cm, Width 6.9 inches or 9.3 cm. Weight 1320 grams or just under 3 lbs.

The Two Lucky god Friends

Daikoku 大黒天

Daikoku is the God of Earth, Agriculture, Rice, Farmers, the Kitchen, & Wealth am hoping by posting this he will send some my way, excerpts from Wiki. He is one of the fSeven Lucky Gods, and associated with the virtue of fortune. Daikokuten or Daikoku is widely known in Japan as the happy-looking god of wealth, farmers, food, and good fortune, although in earlier centuries he was considered a fierce warrior deity. The oldest extant image of Daikokuten in Japan is dated to the late Heian period 794-1185 and installed at Kanzeonji Temple Fukuoka prefecture. T-- From the Japanese Buddhist Statuary:
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The Daikoku is frequently depicted in Japanese art carrying the hammer or sometimes a knife. The first known story of Daikoku origin is India, now part of the culture of most of Asia. Daikokuten 大黒天 literally means Great Black Deva and depending on the Shinto Association can be called a variation of the name as mentioned.

Daikokuten is frequently paired with his buddy Ebisu, another of the Lucky Gods of Fortune seen in displays of the twin patrons by small shopkeepers. They are akways laughing when theyare together. In some versions of the myth they are father and son or master and apprentice. The two are often joined by Fukurokuju to be the ‘Three Gods of Good Fortune’.

Ebisu The Lucky Laughing God

Ebisu 恵比須, is the Japanese god of fishermen, luck, and workingmen, as well as the guardian of the health of small children. He is another one of the Seven Gods of Fortune 七福神, Shichifukujin in Japanese, and he is the only one of the seven to originate from Japan.

Legend has it that a weak child overcame many hardships, grew legs and, presumably, the rest of his skeletal structure at the age of three, and became the god Ebisu. He remains slightly crippled and deaf, but mirthful and auspicious nonetheless hence the title, ‘The Laughing God’. He is often depicted wearing a tall hat—the Kazaori Eboshi 風折烏帽子—holding a rod and a large red sea bream or sea bass. It is believed that Ebisu first arose as a god among fishermen, and that his origin as Hiruko was a much later conception in Shinto religion, after the worship of him had spread to merchants and others. There are many more stories of Daikoku and Ebisu, many if them fun and silly.

Ebisu's festival is celebrated on the twentieth day of the tenth month, Kannazuki the month without gods. While the other myriad of members of the Japanese pantheon gather at The Grand Shrine of Izumo, Ebisu does not hear the summons and is thus still available for worship.

References:
Wikipedia
B.H. Chamberlain, translator 1882. ‘Kojiki’. Retrieved 2006-09-09.
Encyclopedia Nipponica Shogakukan: ‘えびす’

Item ID: A2274


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Japanese Vintage Fine Hirado White Porcelain Ebisu and Daikoku Okimono

$272


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