Japanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing MiceJapanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing Mice

Japanese vintage porcelain Banko ware as a black boot with applied playing mice. This is a hand made, hand painted piece of old Banko, place together with two pieces from a mold, it appears. We did watch a Japanese Ceramics show recently where some of the pieces they make that can look like molds are actually done by hand. It is made with great detail for the seams and other areas in the boot, please see the pictures we have finally added. Japan is imprinted on the side. This better ages it to between 1921-1940 , or after 1953 as the rules have it. I believe mid century is most accurate or between the 1950 and 1960s. It is well made and still in good vintage condition, with no cracks, there is one small area on the bottom edge which looks like a mm chip, and typical aged paint wear. The bottom picture a little out of focus but the bottom is perfect. There is some minor paint wear and some of it is natural due to the roughness of the surface of the porcelain. We have two others made similar to this, in red. Banko wares are from the Mie Prefecture.

Size: Length 3" or 7.62 cms, Height 2 1/2" or 5.08 cm

Someone has a similar piece posted as being made for tourists for Galveston, Texas. Those are my old stomping grounds for many many years, and I can tell you that is not even correct, I spent a lot of time shopping there as well. I asked them where they got that information with no response.

Banko Ware

Banko Ware is a pottery of the Mie Prefecture. The name Banko Ware comes from a merchant Nunami Rouzan in the late 18th century. He placed a seal on the pottery with the words Bankofueki, or eternity or constancy on the ceramics. He was hoping they would be handed down through countless generations. In the late 19th century, Banko Yaki became an export commodity.

In 1979, Yokkaichi Banko Ware was designated as a traditional craftwork. It is the representative local industry of Yokkaichi. Approximately 70-80% of earthen pots made in Japan are produced in Yokkaichi.

Historical information on Banko ware is quite scarce. A 17th century Tokyo potter named Banko made pottery in a unique fashion. In the late 19th century his style was revived near Nagoya and these pieces were made for export in great numbers. Its shapes and decorations are most charming and include flowers, birds, monkeys, sea creatures and human figures. This collection, which has approximately 70 whimsical pieces glazed and unglazed as well as marble ware, is one of the largest in the world.

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Item ID: A225


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Japanese Vintage Porcelain Black Banko Boot with Applied Playing Mice

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The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin
TX
  

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