Japanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White PlatterJapanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White Platter

This Japanese antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 porcelain large blue and white platter dates to the late Edo period and the early to mid-1800's being as much as 200 years old. It is gorgeous with a blue underglaze on handmade white porcelain that is very similar in color to the Hirado ware bowl we just posted. It would make a great decorative or serving dish. It has a wonderful elegant scalloped shape where each scallop is pointed.

The center decoration is made in a fashion of two people drifting on the waves in an old boat, I believe this and the writing may be similar to an old Chinese decorations. Around that are maru-mon, which is the word for circles with decoration in them. These have a man on a horse galloping around the circle in a border around the circle. The largest border on the outer rim of the plate has a plaid fashion with small flowers in it, this is great and done with much detail. This is all hand decorated and painted in underglaze blue like the Hirado bowl.

Condition. The outer rim has some wear underneath the rim is loss of glaze. On the very bottom of the foot rim the same. On the bottom there are many little pinpoint dark dots. These occurred due to glaze popping when it was first made that was not seen then over the 200 years accumulated dirts and stains and such. Still, the top of the charger or platter is gorgeous and still very collectable and decorative or usable, either way.

SIZE: Diameter 12.4-12.5 inches or 31-31.6 cm, Height 1.7 inches or 4.3 cm. Weight 1350 grams or just a few ounches short of three pounds

Imari porcelain

Imari porcelain 伊万里焼 is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. The Japanese as well as Europeans called them Imari. In Japanese, these porcelains are also known as Arita-yaki 有田焼. Imari was the trans-shipment port for Arita wares. There are many styles including Nabeshima and Kakiemon. It was the kilns at Arita which formed the heart of the Japanese porcelain industry.

Though sophisticated wares in authentic Japanese styles were being made at Arita for the fastidious home market, European–style designations of Arita porcelain were formed after blue and white kraak porcelains, imitating Chinese underglaze blue-and-white wares, or made use of enamel colors over underglazes of cobalt blue and iron red. The ware often used copious gilding, sometimes with spare isolated sprigged vignettes, but often densely patterned in compartments.

Imari or Arita porcelain has been continually produced up through the present day.

Item ID: A1999


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Japanese Antique Edo Imari 伊万里焼 Porcelain Large Blue and White Platter

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The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin
TX
  

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