Signed Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎSigned Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎ

This Japanese signed antique Banko-yaki 萬古 silver bowl with a Kintsugi repair is quite lovely with a gorgeous design. What sets it apart from other Banko ware is not only the design but the kintsugi repair, this is an excellent reference piece. A dark maroon star with a central flower is painted in overglaze enamels of a maroon color on a silver background, I believe this represents the sun, or or 太陽 Taiyō. Around the sides are painted a bird and foliage with another strange figure. This was a fine handmade piece at one point and still is.

Someone took the time and lovin care to piece it bak together via the kintsugi method. Kintsugi 金継ぎ, きんつぎ, ‘golden joinery’, also known as Kintsukuroi 金繕い, きんつくろい, "golden repair", is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum, a method similar to the maki-e technique. As a philosophy, it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise. Notice that the kintsugi is only done on one side of the crack, not both. This was originally made during the Meiji period. It is inscribed on the bottom with an old Banko mark, I do not yet know which one. A fine, unique Banko-yaki reference piece is presented. Please notice the 'make an offer; and feel free to inquire.

SIZE: Diameter 7.6 inches or 19.3 cm, Height 3 inches or 7.6 cm

The sun or 太陽 Taiyō

The iconic Japanese symbol is derived from the mythological goddess of the sun, Amaterasu from the Shinto religion. According to myth, the goddess founded Japan approximately 2700 years ago and all the emperors of Japan are known as “Sons of the Sun”, essentially direct descendants of the goddess herself. The design of the national flag reflects the central importance of the sun in Japanese tradition.

Banko 萬古 ware

There is not much historical information to be found on Banko ware. I put what history I could together from the internet as the latest book on Banko ware by Til is one book I do not have in my collection. In 1890, James Bowes of Liverpool, England; in his book titled “Japanese Pottery” wrote:

In 1890, was referred to as Yedo Banko, and said to be associated with the Capitol of Shogun in the city of Tokio, and made by Gazayemon. Under Ise pottery, continued to be made by his son and his grandson after his death, then after; the kiln appears to have been closed. Banko ware was at its highest production as made for export during the Meiji period, turn of the century- late 19th through the early 20th century. As one might expect. Previously it was revived in 1831 by a potter named Yusetsu of Ise’, after the production had ceased in 1785.

In Fanciful Images: Japanese Banko Ceramics Hardcover, in the introduction to his book, Barry Till says: The 17th century Tokyo potter named Banko made pottery in a unique fashion with shapes and decorations include flowers, birds, monkeys, sea creatures and human figures. The late 19th century saw a revival of the Banko style and pieces were made in great numbers. Historical information on early 20th century Japanese Banko ware is quite scarce. This publication discusses the period and features approximately seventy whimsical pieces, both glazed and unglazed, as well as marble ware, from one of the largest private collections in the world.

Banko Ware from the Japan site: Banko Ware is a pottery of the Mie Prefecture. The name Banko Ware comes from a merchant Nunami Rouzan in the late 18th century. He placed a seal on the pottery with the words Bankofueki, or eternity or constancy on the ceramics. He was hoping they would be handed down through countless generations. In the late 19th century, Banko Yaki became an export commodity. In 1979, Yokkaichi Banko Ware was designated as a traditional craftwork. It is the representative local industry of Yokkaichi. Approximately 70-80% of earthen pots made in Japan are produced in Yokkaichi.

Historical information on Banko ware is quite scarce. A 17th century Tokyo potter named Banko made pottery in a unique fashion. In the late 19th century his style was revived near Nagoya and these pieces were made for export in great numbers. Its shapes and decorations are most charming and include flowers, birds, monkeys, sea creatures and human figures. This collection, which has approximately 70 whimsical pieces glazed and unglazed as well as marble ware, is one of the largest in the world.

Item ID: A1935


Always Combined Shipping! International shipping: 25% on orders of $100 USD or moreI

Signed Japanese Antique Banko-yaki 萬古 Silver bowl with Kintsugi 金継ぎ

$100 USD

Add to Cart
Questions about this item?
Email Shop

2 other shoppers have this item in their Cart or Wish List


The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin
TX
  

Japanese Antique and Vintage Pottery, Porcelain, Netsuke, Masks, Okimono, Tea Items, Jewelry & More!

Thank you for visiting! Please see and Important announcements on Main page including our Sale!

Exclusive Ruby Lane Member since 2013

calculating shipping...
140 character limit

More from The Many Faces of Japan