Japanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VIJapanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VIJapanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VIJapanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VIJapanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VIJapanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VI

This signed Japanese antique Kyo-yaki of gosu-aka porcelain dish was made by the very famous Master Potter of Kyoto, Fourth Master Takahashi Dohachi, during the Japanese Meiji period of 1868-1912. This is a rare find made by a member of one of the most important Kyoto potter families. It is fashioned after a fine and great plate made long ago by the Chinese.

This is a handmade plate in namasu size, with a flared top called a Hachi or kobachi depending on the size. It is decorated in gosu-aka-e or special red glaze brought back from China in the 1700's, and green overglazes with the red enamels. It is decorated with this known design of a Phoenix, flower, green leaves outlined in black. It is fashioned after Chinese Ming-era porcelain ware called 'Gosu aka-e'. A very modern phoenix with a design ahead of its time, well designed and finely painted. The Phoenix and popular style flower are surrounded by a gorgeous border of red and silver in different patterns. It is in very good condition with no cracks or chips. The back has an age stain or something that happened in the kiln, somehow we ended up without our Japanese friend's picture of the back so will pull it and add, please message me through the store if you are waiting.

SIZE: Diameter 6.7 inches or 17.02 cm, Height 1.3 inches or 3.30 cm

Gosu aka 呉須 Decoration on Porcelains

The first ceramist to decorate himself to the reproduction of Chinese porcelain was Okuda Eisan( born Okuda Yotaku; 1753-1811. He is said to have introduced the production of porcelain to Kyoto between 1781 and 1789. the newly constructed porcelain kilns, which appeared in rapid succession, were concentrated in the Kiyomizu Gojo-zaka the most famous potter district in Kyoto, immediately adjacent to the Kiyomizu temple. Much of Eisen’s work, especially more refined domestic items in underglaze blue or sometsuke alone or with overglaze decoration in green or red called gosu aka-e, were reproductions of Chinese ceramics of the late Ming(1368-1644), and early Qing(1644-1912) dynasties. Of Eisen’s many pupils, the best known are Aoki Mokubei and Nin’ami Dohachi II.

the Fourth Master Takahashi Dohachi of Kiyomizu

Where Dobachi III was invited to the Prince of Hizen in 1869 to introduce the spirit of Kyoto rather than so many techinical awards, which Dobashi IV was well known for and was honoried by nine medals and certificates at various exhibitions in Japan and abroad. The decorative style introduced by the first Dohachi was carried to perfection by his third son, Master Dohachi the fourth.

History

The first Dohachi, a retainer of the Kame-yama fief in Ise, was born in 1740. His family name was Takahashi. He established himself at Awata in the Horeki era of 1750 - 1763, and having studied the keramic art under Eisen of Kyo-mizu, began the manufacture of pottery. He was an expert bamboo carver, as well as a potter, and he assumed the artist name Shofutei Kuchu. He died in 1804, and was succeeded by his son, the second Dohachi, to whose skill the name chiefly owes its eminence. No potters in Japan seemed to paint on porcelain with more ternderness than the painters in Kyoto.

History by Kanetsugu Ishizawa, Japan:

According to Captain Frank Brinkley's, at one time he visited 17 factories which of course included kilns, and that of these 17 the most important were those of Kanzan Dehichi and Takahashi Dohachi. The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by the retainer of Kameyama fief, Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto. He moved the kiln to the Gojo-zaka area at the foot of Kiyomizu temple. in 1814 And was well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time worked to expand the family reputation within tea circles. This is likely by the 5th or 6th head of that illustrious household. Takahashi Dohachi V. Okawa Yukinosuke, 1869-1914 took over the kiln in 1897 until The second son of Dohachi IV was old enough to be able to take over the business. Takahashi Dohachi VI b. 1881-d. 1941 followed in the footpath of his father and was famed for his sometsuke sencha ware. - From his book, 'The History of Japanese Pottery and Porcelain'.

We have acquired 18 more pages of writings collected from various writers found the internet and from parts of old books including this one from a Japanese gentleman of his travels and research on old Kyo-yaki or Kiyomizu; and Dohachi related porcelains history and Awara wares.

Item ID: A1870


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Japanese Antique Kyo-yaki Gosu-aka Porcelain Dish by Famous Master Takahashi Dohachi VI

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Sharon Meredith
Austin, TX   

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