Japanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチJapanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチ

This Japanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Japanese potter Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチ is made as a kashiki or a bowl that is most often used for serving desserts at the tea ceremony. This is a wonderful Hagi - yaki basket hand glazed in gorgeous plum and gray colors. It is first hand molded with a very nice shape and edges of the bowl and the handle. It is a good size for a serving dish or as a decorative piece, it is large and very heavy. The original description of when we first purchased this, says Yabure handle-bowl, brainpan, hachi . The artist name 頭蓋、ハチ, Tōgai, hachi is most likely Togai VIII in the family of potters. The mark on the bottom does appear to be the last two kanji of this name. Hopefully we have captured the beauty of the glaze and artist work on this lovely Hagi ware bowl. It is an older piece of Hagi ware, about 50-60 years old. There is one kiln flaw seen in the pictures which occurred at the timing of firing so is not a crack and just another part of the beauty of being made in the kiln that can happen from time to time, and does not cause a problem.

SIZE: Diameter over 8" or 20.32 cm, Height of bowl itself 3" Tall or 7.62 cm, Handle height makes it a little taller.

Hagi yaki 萩焼き

The origins of Hagi yaki ware go back about 400 years. It was brought to Japan by potters returning from Korea. There was a decisive battle in 1600 in which the Lord Mori, who was protecting the Korean potters, was defeated, and subsequently moved his castle to Hagi. At this point, a kiln was opened in Hagi, and this was the starting point of Hagi yaki ware. In later times, the style was changed and diversified. One of the features of Hagi yaki ware is the feeling of softness and warmth of the soil in the finished product. It has been used mainly for tea ceremony implements, and the art has been improved and developed. Now, Hagi yaki ware is highly valued as one of the world's greatest types of earthenware.

Another feature of Hagi ware is that it contains cracks, known as 'Kannyu', in its foundation. This gives it different properties of ventilation and water permeability to porcelain. Part of the charm of Hagi ware is the incrustation of tea into the cracks through use, resulting in subtle changes of pattern and color. This is the reason that Hagi ware is respected, and the respect is demonstrated in ancient sayings originating from the world of tea earthenware such as, 'one Raku, two Hagi, three Karatsu', and 'The seven changes of Hagi'. Another element of the charm of Hagi yaki ware is that it gives a feeling of amorousness combined with simplicity. Moreover, the shade will change gradually through use. Enjoy this transformation, and feel the softness and warmth in your hand.

Item ID: A184


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Japanese Vintage Hagi-yaki Ware of Unusual Yabure handle-bow by Tōgai Hachi 頭蓋ハチ

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