Japanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted QingbaiJapanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted Qingbai

This Japanese Kyoto-ware Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain kaki 花器or flower vase represents the art and motif inspired by the Chinese 'spotted qingbai' of the Song and Yuan periods. The dark spots are part of this design and meant to represent dark iron spots. This kabin or flower vase was hand made painted and glazed about 50-60 years ago. It is signed by the artist and per the seller information we have the box is a tomobako, so it was made especially for the vase and is signed by the artist. Some of the writing looks familiar, I just don't read it. We will need to get some assistance with the artist and-or kiln name. A tall cylindrical vase is hand-formed by the potter with a slightly beveled central portion making it nice for gripping, also great since it is tall. It is celadon glazed and the Qingbai style spots are applied with a dark paint. It is a very pretty, tall vase, simple and elegant. It is in very good condition with no cracks or chips. It actually came to us from an antique store in Kyoto. We think that it dates to just past the mid-20th century or so. It is in very good condition with no cracks or chips, the tomobako does show some age wear or darkening. So pending along with many others identification of the artist, potter or kiln if possible. It is a tall vase, I used to the wrong celadon vase measurements so now updated:

SIZE: Height 10 inches or 25.4 cm, Diameter at widest 4.5 inches or 11.43 cm Tall Vase

Kyōto-shi 京都市 and Kyo-yaki 京焼き

Historically known as Meaco, Kyoto most often called Kyōto-shi 京都市, is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million. Formerly the imperial capital of Japan for more than one thousand years, it is now the capital city of Kyoto Prefecture located in the Kansai region, as well as a major part of the Kyoto-Osaka-Kobe metropolitan area. Heian-kyō, the Heian Period capital of Japan that has become the present-day city of Kyoto. As a result the making of Kyoto Ware most often called Kyo-yaki 京焼き, has spread out from the center of Kyoto to regions around Kyoto. It's population is one of many generations of families of potters including many notable and famous potters. Kyoto has a history of 1,200 years. Known as Heian-kyō, the Heian Period capital of Japan that has become the present-day city of Kyoto. Some of the oldest history during the Nara era, a monk, Gyoki built his kiln at the Seikan Temple Higashiyama-ku in Kyoto prefecture) and produced unglazed earthenware. It became famous as Chawanzaka. Before the Muromachi era, potters, from China and Korea, developed their own techniques and affected Japanese potters. Later, some of them moved to Kyoto, the center of Japanese culture, and founded their original styles of Kyoto ware. That is why Kyoto Ware has a wide range of ceramics with the expression of regional characteristics, such as Seto, Mino, Shigaraki, Kokutani, and Koimari.

It is said Kyoto Ware is deep, for it shows the mixture of the diversified ceramic essence. Needless to say, Kyoto Ware is the pride of Japanese tradition. By the end of the Edo era, because of the influence of the Chinese paintings, there were some predominant artists in the Nanga Style Paintings, such as Taiga and Gyokudo who played important roles in the emergence of two tastes in Kyoto and Kiyomizu Ware. One taste is overglaze enamels on potter. The other is porcelain added Chinese features by Eisen.

Kiyomuzu yaki written 清水寺 is the old name for Kyoto Ware pottery and the town, more can be found about this on the internet. In the 17th century, in Kyoto, then Japan's cultural capital, kilns produced lead-glazed pottery like the pottery of southern China. The city pf beautiful artwork is of many generations of families of potters with the skill of the potter being handed down through each generation. Some of the most modern looks, new skills and well known potters art are currently known for their Kyo-Ware or Kyo-yaki for pieces during the second half of the 20th century for more modern pieces.

There are many shaping techniques: hand shaping, potter’s wheel, plaster mold method of embossing, and fluid technique. Most have now switched from traditional climbing kilns for the firing,to electricity or gas. As a result and due to the many various glazing techniques brought to use by the newer generations of potters over the last 60 years or so, a new style of Kyoto Ware has emerged.

Item ID: A1575


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Japanese Vintage Kyo-yaki Celadon Porcelain 花器 Kaki or Flower vase Inspired by Spotted Qingbai

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