Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷

This Izushi-ware 出石焼 porcelain okimono or ornament of Kannon is a beautiful and natural artist depiction of the Guanshiyin Bodhisattva. Kannon or 観音 is her name in Japan, and in each Eastern country, her name varies. She is commonly known in English as Goddess of Mercy, this lovely Kannon was made about 40 years ago, towards the end of the Showa period in the 1980's. Okimono 置物 is a Japanese term meaning 'ornament for display or decorative object', and typically displayed in a tokonoma alcove or butsudan, a Buddhist altar.

This is a handmade artist piece which has been skillfully hand molded or 'tebineri' in Japanese. She is hand-glazed and fired in a kiln. She is very natural and realistic looking and her glaze is absolutely gorgeous. Her feet politely closed together taking the often seen short humble and lady- like steps walking in her traditional kimono robe, her hands together, and head down. She has a happy, peaceful small smile on her face that looks like she has a secret. She wears the often seen tall headdress of the Kannon. This white glaze kimono adorned Kannon is a beautiful and well done artist depiction of Guanyin, Kannon, or the Goddess of Mercy. She will create a glow of pureness and spirituality in any corner she is displayed in. She is in excellent elegant Izushi condition, with no cracks, chips or repairs.

SIZE: Height 7.3 in. or 18.54 cm, Width 2.2 in. or 5.58 cm, Depth 1.8 in. or 4.57 cm. Prepacked weight about 1/2 lb.

The Potter Yamamoto Shuko

The bottom of the okimono is signed, we were fortunate to find from the very kind Japanese dealer today on the bottom it says 'Izushi-yaki' or 出石焼, and signed by the artist as 山本秀壷 or possibly 山本修子 for potter name Yamamoto Shuko. The potter's name was provided by the seller in Japan, but it is often hard to get more information and fin it on Japan. We found two other pieces of Izushi yaki by this potter, but no other specific information about them, but that is not unusual searching from on country's domain to the other, and sometimes due to the 'romanticizing' of the language it does not translate the same everywhere. Yamamoto is a name frequently used and possibly the potter name and not the given name, often making it harder to find information about a specific Japanese potter. It is a gorgeous, hand signed piece by the potter and artist.

Izushi-ware 出石焼

Izushi-ware refers to white porcelain produced in the town of Izushi, in Hyogo Prefecture. During the 1700s kaolin was discovered in the area, resulting in an influx of craftsmen being brought in from Arita to help with production. Izushi-ware is characterized by its clean, pure white surface, as well as its elegant designs. Izushi porcelain is burned with pure white materials called Kakitani Toseki or Kakitani Pottery Stone. and its mysterious whiteness is unmatched. It is characterized by its silken texture and delicate sculpture which is produced by the potter’s polished skill. In 1980, the government of Japan designated it as a traditional handicraft. Also there are two types of glazes, transparent and matte. These days kilns mainly produce items for the tea ceremony, but they also produce a fine range of vases and okimono. Currently, four potteries not only produce Izushi ware and pass on its traditions but also they pursue collaboration with tourism industry, such as adopting painting experience on the tourist route.

Kannon is an East Asian spiritual figure of mercy, and a bodhisattva associated with compassion as venerated by Mahayana Buddhists. The name Guanyin is short for Guanshiyin, which means 'Perceiving the Sounds or Cries of the World'. Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus, and then sent to the western pure land of Sukhāvatī. - History from Wiki, see more there for more history, and her common depictions and legends.

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Item ID: A1551


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Japanese Izushi-ware 出石焼 Porcelain Okimono or Statue of Kannon by First Class Potter Yamamoto Shuko, 山本秀壷

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The Many Faces of Japan


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Austin
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