Japanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket DishJapanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket Dish

This lovely vIntage Koransha porcelain round box was most likely made as a trinket or jewelry dish, it is not the usual style or size of a kogo or other. The lovely always hand made Koransha porcelain is painted is a deep royal blue, the hand painted with flowers and designs in between in gold, then hand glazed. It would make a wonderful gift. It is signed on the bottom with the Koransha orchid mark and "有田焼香蘭社" which is Arita-yaki Kōransha. For the timeline of this mark, which was just around the time of the Koransha 100 year anniversary in 1979. It was also a few years after they developed the high purity alumina porcelain. Koransha makes some of the finest porcelains there is. This gorgeous dish is in excellent condition, no cracks or chips. Sorry, the stand is not included.

SIZE: Diameter 3 1/2" or 8.89 cm, Height 2" or 5.08 cm

香蘭社 Koransha- The old and the new

Koransha porcelain is known in the world as a manufacturer of fine arts of ceramics known as Arita (Imari) Ware. Historically, Koransha evolved as part of the Fukagawa company. Koransha was started by the 8th Eizaemon Fukagawa in 1875. Koransha is now a separate company located in Arita, Japan. Having won many prizes for it's unique and beautiful porcelains both before and since the split, the complete 350-year history of Koransha can be seen on their current company website. Most of the antique Koransha we see now is from the Japanese Meiji Period (late 19th century), Workmanship is always very fine and detailed often Nabeshima- like because of the closeness of Nabeshima and Hirado kilns and the previous works of both sometimes made at Hirado kilns.

Fukagawa and its previous Koransha branch had achieved supremacy in porcelain-making operations at the old imperial kilns of the Duke of Hirado at Mikawachi by the mid-19th century. Hirado wares with over glaze polychrome decoration and the Orchid Koransha mark are illustrated in 'Hirado Prince of Porcelains' by Louis Lawrence. As the Meiji period progressed, the fragrant orchid mark in over glaze red and later underglaze blue was used as the logo on more common export wares of the Koransha group.

Early Meiji-period that painted Fukagawa porcelain as well as other products of the Mikawachi kilns that were exported as Hirado wares. The distinction between Fukagawa and Hirado tends to blur after the start of the Meiji era, when greater attention started to focus on exports. There is much history in between on the Koransha company website, but of interest in 2006, Shinichi Fukagawa assumed the position of the chairman of Koransha Co., Ltd.; and Noriyuki Fukagawa assumed the position of the president of Koransha Co., Ltd.

Item ID: A1115


Always Combined Shipping! International shipping: 25% on orders of $100 USD or moreI

Japanese VIntage Arita-yaki Koransha 有田焼 香蘭社 Porcelain Royal Blue Covered Trinket Dish

$85 $69 USD SALE

Add to Cart
Questions about this item?
Email Shop

15 other shoppers have this item in their Cart or Wish List


The Many Faces of Japan


Sharon Meredith
Austin
TX
  

Japanese Antique and Vintage Pottery, Porcelain, Netsuke, Masks, Okimono, Tea Items, Jewelry & More!

Thank you for visiting! Please see Important announcements on our Main page including our Sales!

Exclusive Ruby Lane Member since 2013

calculating shipping...

More from The Many Faces of Japan