Very Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled JugVery Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled Jug

One of my favorite types of pottery for display are those with lead repairs. Basically, as early pieces of pottery were necessities in daily life and often broke due to high usage, there were specialists in repairing them. These repair specialists used lead, often in staples, to put back handles, mend cracks and restore the usefulness of the treasured pottery item.

In this large and quite heavy blue and white transferware water jug, the lead repairs are found in the pottery handle. There was a crack from age and use so the specialist mended it at the top and secured the bottom of the handle with lead so that it could be used just like new.

The first noticeable thing about the jug, however (other than its majestic size), is its wonderfully proportioned shape. The octangular shape allows the bottom to flare out, while becoming narrower toward the rim, which has a slight flare itself. There is a very wide shaped spout for the easy flow of water. The second handle for several fingers and a thumb was created to help raise the heavy jug and carry it and pour from it.

The designs of the blue and white transferware are just as romantic and charming as could they possibly be. The designer has given us a glimpse into idyllic country life that everyone in Victorian times romanticized. There is a group of sheep to the right of the central picture, with two farmers engaged in conversation by a gate. The thatched roof cottage has a smoking chimney. In back of the cottage is a church and another cottage. There are trees, shrubs and leaves to complete the picture. One of the nicer features of the transferware and the shape is that the design of the cottages and landscape is nearly continuous, as it ends at the smaller front handle. Along both the bottom and the top of the jug is a floral border with scrolls and leaves everywhere. This design is repeated on the handle.

There is a large old section of pottery on the bottom rim that is missing. There also are several old chips on the spout and one small old chip on the handle. There is a slight bit of wear to the glaze on the handle. However, in spite of these flaws, this is still a spectacular piece of transferware from around 1840. I believe the thick blue glaze has protected much of the pottery, especially the surface, over the years.

This piece would make a showy table centerpiece or as an addition to a kitchen counter, or wherever else it would fit. With its great presence, character and strong decorative appeal, the allure of its special early Victorian romantic appeal would help bring any room come to life.

It measures 14-1/4 inches high, and it is 10-3/4 inches wide at the base.

ITEM ID
PJR-1171
ITEM TYPE
Antique
TYPE
Pottery, Staffordshire
PURPOSE
Jugs
ORIGIN
Staffordshire • Staffordshire
STYLE
Victorian
COLOR
Blue, White

Very Large and Impressive Early Victorian Staffordshire Blue and White Transfer Two-Handled Jug

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