Hand Painted Nippon Bell

This example is a fake that often will be described by resellers as 'hand painted' and 'Nippon,' based solely on the mark seen inside the bell. Inside the bell is a leaf with the words "hand painted and Nippon". But the decorations on the item are transfers applied at the factory, not 'Hand Painted' and the shape is contemporary. No authentic ceramic item like this was ever made at any time during the Nippon era, and so no authentic Nippon mark should be present on it. Meaning, the Nippon mark inside is just as new as the item to which it was applied.

Differences between the mark shown and an authentic Nippon era mark can be noted, such as the uncharacteristic size of the Maple leaf. In a real Nippon maple leaf back stamp the leaf is smaller and in keeping with the size of the wording. Fakers make their leaf much bigger so it seems to have more importance. The purpose of its large size is to draw the eye of the observer immediately to the word 'Nippon' beneath it.

The manufacturer's of these types of new pieces originally made this particular mark with a looped crossbar on the H of 'Hand Painted.' When collectors got wise to this easily enough, however, they changed to the mark illustrated on this example. But, this newer mark is not quite right, either. The crossbar of the H in an original Nippon mark is a graceful arc that travels up to nearer the top of the first down-stroke of the H. Here it is a straight line that crosses at a point near the bottom. Of course, this slight nuance can always be changed again at some point in the future to again fine-tune the fakery, so its best not to always try to rely only on a mark for authentication.

In the case of this item, remember the Nippon era ended nearly 100 years ago. So, genuine Nippon era pieces will generally exhibit some signs of wear or patina, especially if they are in a form intended for a consumer to use, like a hand bell. The handle on this piece is painted gold which has a high surface shine showing no evidence of wear where hands would have presumably grasped it over many years. The bottom edge of the bell shows the porcelain body to be thick and modern in appearance. Not at all comparable to true Nippon era ware.

The yellow and pink rose design on this bell and the yellow shaded background can commonly be found on a variety of other objects, some of which will have different specious marks other than a false Nippon mark. Search inside this shop to see other porcelain pieces with similar shaded rose designs.

This bell example measures 4 1/2 inches tall.

Item ID: 2007RP000165

Hand Painted Nippon Bell

Hand Painted Nippon Bell
Hand Painted Nippon Bell
Hand Painted Nippon Bell
Hand Painted Nippon Bell

This example is a fake that often will be described by resellers as 'hand painted' and 'Nippon,' based solely on the mark seen inside the bell. Inside the bell is a leaf with the words "hand painted and Nippon". But the decorations on the item are transfers applied at the factory, not 'Hand Painted' and the shape is contemporary. No authentic ceramic item like this was ever made at any time during the Nippon era, and so no authentic Nippon mark should be present on it. Meaning, the Nippon mark inside is just as new as the item to which it was applied.

Differences between the mark shown and an authentic Nippon era mark can be noted, such as the uncharacteristic size of the Maple leaf. In a real Nippon maple leaf back stamp the leaf is smaller and in keeping with the size of the wording. Fakers make their leaf much bigger so it seems to have more importance. The purpose of its large size is to draw the eye of the observer immediately to the word 'Nippon' beneath it.

The manufacturer's of these types of new pieces originally made this particular mark with a looped crossbar on the H of 'Hand Painted.' When collectors got wise to this easily enough, however, they changed to the mark illustrated on this example. But, this newer mark is not quite right, either. The crossbar of the H in an original Nippon mark is a graceful arc that travels up to nearer the top of the first down-stroke of the H. Here it is a straight line that crosses at a point near the bottom. Of course, this slight nuance can always be changed again at some point in the future to again fine-tune the fakery, so its best not to always try to rely only on a mark for authentication.

In the case of this item, remember the Nippon era ended nearly 100 years ago. So, genuine Nippon era pieces will generally exhibit some signs of wear or patina, especially if they are in a form intended for a consumer to use, like a hand bell. The handle on this piece is painted gold which has a high surface shine showing no evidence of wear where hands would have presumably grasped it over many years. The bottom edge of the bell shows the porcelain body to be thick and modern in appearance. Not at all comparable to true Nippon era ware.

The yellow and pink rose design on this bell and the yellow shaded background can commonly be found on a variety of other objects, some of which will have different specious marks other than a false Nippon mark. Search inside this shop to see other porcelain pieces with similar shaded rose designs.

This bell example measures 4 1/2 inches tall.

Item ID: 2007RP000165

Modern Reproductions, Fakes and Fantasies


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