Cabinet Photo of Rev. George Drew Egbert Crime Prevention Society~VICE SQUAD

Original late 19th century/early 20th century Cabinet Photograph of famed Clergy/Pastor George Drew Egbert. Here is the obituary of Rev. Egbert from the New York Times, July 30, 1940: Rev. G.D. Egbert, 75, of Flushing Dies

Pastor of First Congregational Church was President of Queens Federation Formerly a Moderator Leader of Crusades on Vice Had Served as Head of the Crime Prevention Society

The Rev. George Drew Egbert, pastor of the First Congregational Church of Flushing, Thirty-eighth Avenue and Browne Street, Flushing, Queens, died yesterday in the physicians Hospital, Jackson Heights, after an illness of several months. He was 75 years old. His home was at 38-20 Browne Street, Flushing. Survivors are a son, Professor Donald D. Egbert of Princeton University; two daughters, Mrs. Louise Egbert Sailer, wife of Dr. Randolph C. Sailer, an instructor in Yan Ching University, Peiping, China, and Miss Miriam Estelle Egbert, an executive in Greenwood School, Ruxton, MD; a brother, Professor James C. Egbert of Columbia University, and two sisters, the Misses Annie and Marion Egbert of Jackson Heights. The Rev Dr. Thomas McKenzie, pastor emeritus of the Dutch Reformed Church of Flushing, will conduct a funeral service at 5 pm. tomorrow in the First Congregational Church of Flushing. Foe of Gambling Mr. Egbert was president of the Queens Federation of Churches and for many years chairman of the committee on licensure and ordination of the New York City Association of Congregational Churches. He also had served the latter organization as Moderator. He was best known, however, as president of the Society for the Prevention of Crime. For many years he maintained a policy of never announcing beforehand the topics of his sermons. He did not favor more than one sermon a Sunday, feeling no minister could do justice to two. He favored the use of motion pictures at evening services, and once invited golf players to an early-morning service all togged out even to golf clubs, which they left outside the church. He had led crusades against vice and crime, particularly as head of the Society for the prevention of Crime. Among the objects of his attacks were the policy racket and other forms of gambling, and organized crime at the end of the prohibition era. Occasionally he spoke out as a minister on other matters affecting his locality. In 1930 and 1931 he opposed granting a license for the construction of a swimming pool on a site adjoining the historic Quaker Meeting House on Northern Boulevard, near Main Street, Flushing. The house, built in 1694, is still used by members of the Flushing Religious Society of Friends, which group has existed in the community since the days when George Fox, early English Quaker preacher, stood beneath two oak trees and preached opposite Fox Lane. Championed Society of Friends When the Society of Friends retained Charles S. Colden, later County Judge, as their attorney to protest against a swimming pool so close to their place of worship, Mr. Egbert sympathized with them in published statements and interviews and declared a principle was at stake “that affects all churches.” This, he said, was a question as to the right of noisy amusement centers to establish themselves along side churches, particularly where liable to attract large Sunday crowds. The issue was settled by agreement of the pool operators to refrain from opening on Sundays until afternoon and not until the Sunday meeting of the Quakers was over. Mr. Egbert’s outstanding fight was that against the prevalence of gambling, particularly through policy slips, in the spring of 1935. The New York County Grand Jury, after going over gambling exhibits and a list of fifty gambling places Mr. Egbert had submitted, petitioned Governor Lehman for a special prosecutor. Thomas E. Dewey was appointed. Won Against Slot Machines Early in his tenure of the office as president of the crime-prevention society, Mr. Egbert took part in a fight against slot machines. Governor Lehman sent him the pen with which he later signed the Anti-Slot-Machine Bill. He had lived in Flushing since February, 1911, having gone there from Norwalk, Conn., where he had been pastor of the First Congregational Church. His first pastorate was the Canterbury Presbyterian Church in Cornwall, New York. While there he took part in the no-license campaigns and opposed gambling. He continued reform agitation at Norwalk, where he was chairman of the ministers’ association. He served each of these churches for eleven years. Mr. Egbert was born on May 6, 1865, in West Hoboken, New Jersey, the son of James C. Egbert ad the former Harriet Louise Drew. He was graduated in 1885 from Columbia University, where he attained Phi Beta Kappa honors, and later from Union Thological Seminary. On Oct. 22, 1891, he married Miss Kate Estelle Powers. Mrs. Egbert died on Dec. 18, 1938.

Cabinet photograph measures 6" x 8 inches.

Item ID: 2094

Cabinet Photo of Rev. George Drew Egbert Crime Prevention Society~VICE SQUAD

Cabinet Photo of Rev. George Drew Egbert Crime Prevention Society~VICE SQUAD
Cabinet Photo of Rev. George Drew Egbert Crime Prevention Society~VICE SQUAD
Cabinet Photo of Rev. George Drew Egbert Crime Prevention Society~VICE SQUAD

Original late 19th century/early 20th century Cabinet Photograph of famed Clergy/Pastor George Drew Egbert. Here is the obituary of Rev. Egbert from the New York Times, July 30, 1940: Rev. G.D. Egbert, 75, of Flushing Dies

Pastor of First Congregational Church was President of Queens Federation Formerly a Moderator Leader of Crusades on Vice Had Served as Head of the Crime Prevention Society

The Rev. George Drew Egbert, pastor of the First Congregational Church of Flushing, Thirty-eighth Avenue and Browne Street, Flushing, Queens, died yesterday in the physicians Hospital, Jackson Heights, after an illness of several months. He was 75 years old. His home was at 38-20 Browne Street, Flushing. Survivors are a son, Professor Donald D. Egbert of Princeton University; two daughters, Mrs. Louise Egbert Sailer, wife of Dr. Randolph C. Sailer, an instructor in Yan Ching University, Peiping, China, and Miss Miriam Estelle Egbert, an executive in Greenwood School, Ruxton, MD; a brother, Professor James C. Egbert of Columbia University, and two sisters, the Misses Annie and Marion Egbert of Jackson Heights. The Rev Dr. Thomas McKenzie, pastor emeritus of the Dutch Reformed Church of Flushing, will conduct a funeral service at 5 pm. tomorrow in the First Congregational Church of Flushing. Foe of Gambling Mr. Egbert was president of the Queens Federation of Churches and for many years chairman of the committee on licensure and ordination of the New York City Association of Congregational Churches. He also had served the latter organization as Moderator. He was best known, however, as president of the Society for the Prevention of Crime. For many years he maintained a policy of never announcing beforehand the topics of his sermons. He did not favor more than one sermon a Sunday, feeling no minister could do justice to two. He favored the use of motion pictures at evening services, and once invited golf players to an early-morning service all togged out even to golf clubs, which they left outside the church. He had led crusades against vice and crime, particularly as head of the Society for the prevention of Crime. Among the objects of his attacks were the policy racket and other forms of gambling, and organized crime at the end of the prohibition era. Occasionally he spoke out as a minister on other matters affecting his locality. In 1930 and 1931 he opposed granting a license for the construction of a swimming pool on a site adjoining the historic Quaker Meeting House on Northern Boulevard, near Main Street, Flushing. The house, built in 1694, is still used by members of the Flushing Religious Society of Friends, which group has existed in the community since the days when George Fox, early English Quaker preacher, stood beneath two oak trees and preached opposite Fox Lane. Championed Society of Friends When the Society of Friends retained Charles S. Colden, later County Judge, as their attorney to protest against a swimming pool so close to their place of worship, Mr. Egbert sympathized with them in published statements and interviews and declared a principle was at stake “that affects all churches.” This, he said, was a question as to the right of noisy amusement centers to establish themselves along side churches, particularly where liable to attract large Sunday crowds. The issue was settled by agreement of the pool operators to refrain from opening on Sundays until afternoon and not until the Sunday meeting of the Quakers was over. Mr. Egbert’s outstanding fight was that against the prevalence of gambling, particularly through policy slips, in the spring of 1935. The New York County Grand Jury, after going over gambling exhibits and a list of fifty gambling places Mr. Egbert had submitted, petitioned Governor Lehman for a special prosecutor. Thomas E. Dewey was appointed. Won Against Slot Machines Early in his tenure of the office as president of the crime-prevention society, Mr. Egbert took part in a fight against slot machines. Governor Lehman sent him the pen with which he later signed the Anti-Slot-Machine Bill. He had lived in Flushing since February, 1911, having gone there from Norwalk, Conn., where he had been pastor of the First Congregational Church. His first pastorate was the Canterbury Presbyterian Church in Cornwall, New York. While there he took part in the no-license campaigns and opposed gambling. He continued reform agitation at Norwalk, where he was chairman of the ministers’ association. He served each of these churches for eleven years. Mr. Egbert was born on May 6, 1865, in West Hoboken, New Jersey, the son of James C. Egbert ad the former Harriet Louise Drew. He was graduated in 1885 from Columbia University, where he attained Phi Beta Kappa honors, and later from Union Thological Seminary. On Oct. 22, 1891, he married Miss Kate Estelle Powers. Mrs. Egbert died on Dec. 18, 1938.

Cabinet photograph measures 6" x 8 inches.

Item ID: 2094

$100 USD

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